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There are 286 essays on to kill a mockingbird.

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Student Essays on to kill a mockingbird
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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mockingbird, Literary Analysis
4,385 words, approx. 15 pages
Provides a literary analysis of "To Kill a Mockingbird," a novel by Harper Lee. Details the plot. Analyzes quotes from the text.
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Essay Grade: 86%
An Examination of Character Relationships in To Kill a Mocking Bird
2,667 words, approx. 9 pages
Evaluates the relationships between major characters in Harper Lee's novel, To Kill a Mocking Bird. Discusses the various types of conflicts experienced between the characters and discusses how this affects the plot of the novel.
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Essay Grade: 87%
Summary of Chapters 1-31 of "To Kill a Mockingbird"
2,590 words, approx. 9 pages
Essay provides a summary of Chapters 1-31 of the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 88%
Why to Kill a Mockingbird and Huckleberry Finn Should Not Be Censored
2,411 words, approx. 8 pages
Describes the negative effects of censorship. Argues why To Kill a Mockingbird and Huckleberry Finn should not be censored.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Education under the Magnifying Glass.
2,223 words, approx. 7 pages
This essay is a brief introspection into the theme of education presented in the first six chapters of Harper Lee's book, 'To Kill a Mockingbird.'
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Essay Grade: 83%
Coming of Age in to Kill a Mockingbird
2,107 words, approx. 7 pages
In the novel To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Jem, a ten-year-old boy, and Scout, a six-year-old girl, two children who live in the southern town Maycomb, Alabama, are shown in their adventures that help them mature. Jem and Scout gain much insight into the workings of the society in which they live through Tom Robinson's trial, and ultimately shed their childhood innocence at that point.
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Essay Grade: 91%
To Kill a Mockingbird - Book Overview
1,927 words, approx. 6 pages
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Book Essay
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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mockingbird
1,904 words, approx. 6 pages
Reviews the Harper Lee novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. Describes the main characters and provides a plot summary.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird: A Child's Perspective
1,768 words, approx. 6 pages
Review the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. Describes how Lee utilizes the child characters to give a unique perspective to the story, allowing the reader to view the story without bias.
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Essay Grade: 83%
Annotations, Study Guide for To Kill a Mockingbird
1,751 words, approx. 6 pages
Analyzes key quotes from To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Includes annotations, lists character names for each quote.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Psychological Abuse in to Kill a Mockingbird
1,680 words, approx. 6 pages
In Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird, although Maycomb County may appear to be a typical town filled with southern hospitality, deep within the community there is a great level of psychological abuse which occurs. This can be seen in the many relationships between the citizens of Maycomb, and their belittling behavior toward one another. Throughout this novel, this psychological abuse becomes evident to the reader through the fearful depiction of Boo Radley, persistence of Aunt Alexandria to reform the Finch family, criticism of Atticus, and racism toward African Americans.

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Essay Grade: 92%
Book Review of "To Kill a Mockingbird"
1,629 words, approx. 5 pages
The classic novel, "To Kill a Mockingbird" has multiple layers of themes that are described in the essay along with a description of major characters.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird - Trial Scene and Its Relationship to Rest of the Novel
1,623 words, approx. 5 pages
Tom Robinson's trial was one of the famous scenes in the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" which clearly sculptured out the prejudice, innocence, good and evil in the society of Maycomb.
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Essay Grade: 83%
How is To Kill a Mockingbird Effective?
1,597 words, approx. 5 pages
The opening of the film "To Kill a Mockingbird" is effective. It is effective because it introduces all of the prominent characters of the film with a flow to the scene. The use of narration is also vital to the viewer as it sets the scene of the film. Also, as shown in the opening credits, camera effects and symbolical objects are used to condense many issues and themes that are revealed to be extremely important in the film.
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Essay Grade: 88%
The Use of Conflict in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
1,501 words, approx. 5 pages
The use of conflicts drive the plot, themes and characters in the Harper Lee's classic novel, "To Kill A Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 78%
To Kill a Mocking Bird: Simple Hell People Give Other People" in the Novel
1,462 words, approx. 5 pages
In "To Kill a Mockingbird", "the simple hell people give other people" is racism and judgementalism.
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Essay Grade: 93%
Atticus - Generative Man
1,440 words, approx. 5 pages
Essay analyzes the character of Atticus from the story "To Kill A Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mockingbird, Theme Analysis
1,408 words, approx. 5 pages
Analyzes the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Explores major themes and provides examples from the text to support the themes.
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Essay Grade: 83%
To Kill a Mockingbird
1,393 words, approx. 5 pages
"Don't judge a man until you've walked two moons in his moccasins." This is a quote from the novel Walk Two Moons, written by Sharon Creech, which exemplifies the same idea in which Atticus conveys throughout To Kill A Mockingbird.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Use of the Word "Nigger" in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
1,382 words, approx. 5 pages
The use of the derogatory word "nigger" by characters in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" reveals the underlying racism of the community. This undercurrent links the first half of the novel with the second half.
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Essay Grade: 78%
"To Kill a Mockingbird"
1,379 words, approx. 5 pages
"To Kill a Mockingbird", by Harper Lee, is an outstanding work of American literature, discussing issues of 'race' in Southern states. To Kill A Mockingbird is set in a more religious era but Harper Lee wants us to know that there were no people in Maycomb who are more religious than the Negroes. The white people are Christian because it's right and good but the black community is faithful from the heart.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Analysis of Scout
1,376 words, approx. 5 pages
Essay describes the changes in Scout in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 88%
Racism in `to Kill a Mockingbird'
1,364 words, approx. 5 pages
Examines the theme of racism in Harper Lee's novel "To Kill a Mockingbird." Explores Lee's experiences growing up in the south. Describes how Lee uses her vast knowledge of justice and the southern culture of the 1930s to explore its racism.
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Essay Grade: 86%
A Plot Summary of To Kill a Mockingbird
1,363 words, approx. 5 pages
Provides a plot summary of the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Narrative Structure in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mocking Bird
1,343 words, approx. 5 pages
Overview of the structure of To Kill A Mocking Bird essay structure. Examines the way the author, Harper Lee, helps the reader understand the characters through point of View, Setting and narrative structure.
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Essay Grade: 94%
To Kill a Mockingbird
1,301 words, approx. 4 pages
"To Kill A Mockingbird" written by Harper Lee is a coming of age story that speaks of racism and how at such a young age the Finch children deal with it.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Discus Trial Scene Relationship with the Rest of the Novel
1,296 words, approx. 4 pages
In "To Kill a Mocking Bird", by Harper Lee, The hatred between "Black" and "White" Americans clearly showed up during the trial Tom Robinson and brought up all the evil and good in Maycomb society.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Atticus' Decision to Support Tom Robinson
1,293 words, approx. 4 pages
Essay discusses reactions from the town people towards Atticus Finches' decision to defend Tom Robinson in his trial in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 86%
Scout's Growing Up through the Novel
1,293 words, approx. 4 pages
Jean Louise Finch was well known as Scout, and that's the way she liked it. She wasn't much of a girl, she was very tomboyish and had a lot to learn. She thought she knew everything but she was beginning her learning process in the first summer of the book, "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 98%
Atticus Finch's Closing Statement
1,264 words, approx. 4 pages
A student's original closing statement from the view of Atticus Finch of Harper Lee's famous novel, To Kill a Mockingbird.
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Essay Grade: 92%
To Kill a Mockingbird- Trial Reactions
1,261 words, approx. 4 pages
This is an essay about the reactions to the trial in the book "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Judicial Inequality in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
1,243 words, approx. 4 pages
Essay comparing judicial inequality in To Kill a Mockingbird" to modern day.
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Essay Grade: 93%
Examples of Courage in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
1,236 words, approx. 4 pages
Essay discusses the aspect of courage in the novel "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Atticus Finch's Display of Human Decency
1,223 words, approx. 4 pages
Essay discusses Atticus Finch's display of human decency in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 92%
Justice in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
1,215 words, approx. 4 pages
This essay discusses the theme of the book "To Kill a Mockingbird" in a literary analysis.
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Essay Grade: 81%
Scout's Lessons in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
1,195 words, approx. 4 pages
In Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird," the character of Scout learns many life lessons, including courage (as shown by Atticus), pride in one's beliefs, and the evils of prejudice.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Explore Intolerance in 'to Kill a Mockingbird'
1,194 words, approx. 4 pages
In `To Kill a Mockingbird' the character Dolphus Raymond describes, "the simple hell, people give other people." Through Maycomb, Harper Lee presents a community that has bred a culture of prejudice and intolerance. Discuss.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Scout Finch; Two Mothers Are Better Than One
1,190 words, approx. 4 pages
This essay is about Harper Lee's book, "To Kill a Mockingbird," and is about how Scout is mothered by three women although she doesnt really have a mother.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Atticus Compared to Today's African-American Fathers
1,167 words, approx. 4 pages
A comparison of the fictional father Atticus in "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee and the lack of fathers and other male role models in many contemporary African-American families. Because of a lack of responsibility by many African-American fathers, black families have high rates of broken families, in the opinion of the author.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Life Lessons
1,158 words, approx. 4 pages
Analyzes values that can be learned by reading Harper Lee's novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. Discusses how Lee deals with racial issues, courage and empathy. Explores the character of Atticus Fench.
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Essay Grade: 96%
Courage in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
1,143 words, approx. 4 pages
Essay discusses the courage shown of the characters in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 88%
Comparison of the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee and the Film
1,124 words, approx. 4 pages
Comparing the movie "To Kill a Mockingbird" to the novel written by Harper Lee. Essay focuses on the different portrayals of Scout in the film and the novel as well as ways in which Atticus Finch is characterized differently in each medium.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Parents: Atticus vs. Bob Ewell in To Kill a Mockingbird
1,114 words, approx. 4 pages
A comparison of the different parenting styles illustrated by Bob Ewell and Atticus in the novel To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Both individuals influence their children through different parenting methods. These different styles of parenting are shown through the affection they give to their children, their moral values, their opinions of education, and their problem-solving methods.
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Essay Grade: 75%
Response to To Kill A Mockingbird
1,102 words, approx. 4 pages
In To Kill A Mocking Bird, Tom Robinson was as innocent and pleasant as a mocking bird. However racial prejudice and ignorance called for his death for a crime he didn't commit.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Intolerance in To Kill a Mockingbird
1,101 words, approx. 4 pages
Throughout her novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee presents many aspects of a divided community that is governed by prejudice and steeped in a culture of intolerance. Her use of certain characters, such as Atticus Finch, who stand up to such intolerance, helps Lee to highlight the level of intolerance in Maycomb County and to portray her own personal views.
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Essay Grade: 92%
The Struggle of Boo Radley in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
1,099 words, approx. 4 pages
In "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, the character of Boo Radley is misunderstood because of prejudice and an unwillingness to let him tell his story. One morale of the novel is that people should strive to live in harmony and walk in someone else's shoes before judging them.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Racism in "To Kill a Mockingbird" and "A Patch of Blue"
1,094 words, approx. 4 pages
The narrators in two civil rights novels, "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee and "A Patch of Blue" by Elizabeth Kata are naive to the reality of racism. Also, the literary techniques used by both authors.
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Essay Grade: 83%
Courage in To Kill a Mockingbird
1,088 words, approx. 4 pages
Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird shows how courage can be shown in different ways and that even the most subtle act of courage makes a difference. There is courage to tell the truth, as illustrated in the courtroom by Tom Robinson. There is courage in being in a minority and remaining as such, as shown through Atticus' late-night meeting and Jem and Scout's accompanying Calpurnia to service at the black church. And there is courage to change, as depicted through Scout following Atticus' request not to fight anymore.
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Essay Grade: 78%
Mockingbird
1,080 words, approx. 4 pages
Relationships and their influences are the key messages in "To Kill A Mockingbird". Throughout the story these relationships are most greatly influenced by injustice, racsism and intollerance.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Theme Analysis of "To Kill a Mockingbird"
1,075 words, approx. 4 pages
This essay is about the main themes of racism, prejudice, and innocence in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Scout's Growth from Innocence to Experience
1,063 words, approx. 4 pages
Explores the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Discusses the growth from innocence to experience of the character Scout. Describes how the novel documents her growth over a three-year period and shows how her curious and observing manner helps her learn, progress and grow from an innocent young child into a more experienced and mature young lady.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Point of View and Social Commentary in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
1,059 words, approx. 4 pages
A discussion of Harper Lee's novel "To Kill a Mockingbird", focusing on why Lee chose Scout as the narrator and the book's social commentary on Maycomb, Georgia.
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Essay Grade: 81%
To Kill a Mockingbird the Book Vs. the Movie
1,058 words, approx. 4 pages
To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee is a very elaborate book which centers mainly around the development of the main character, Scout, and her family who live in the south during the great depression. There are many characters who, in the film, were left out, but whose presence was critical to the story in the book. The most important of these characters are Lula, Alexandra, and Jack.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Atticus Finch as a Hero
1,053 words, approx. 4 pages
Atticus Finch is a significant character in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird because he is an idol in the eyes of his children, a saviour in the eyes of Tom Robinson, and a hero in the eyes of modern society. A widowed working father who has the courage to rise above the prejudice of society and do what is right, Atticus is an inspiring figure in modern times because it takes pure courage to stand up to a community set on doing the wrong thing.
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Essay Grade: 81%
What Jem and Scout Learned in To Kill a Mockingbird
1,043 words, approx. 4 pages
Through the course of Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Jem and Scout mature and develop through a series of learning experiences and encounters that they undergo. These events enable Jem and Scout to learn about courage, moral integrity, stereotypes, and the general functioning of society.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Parent Child Relationships in To Kill a Mockingbird
1,035 words, approx. 4 pages
Discusses Harper Lee's novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. With close reference to the text, examines two sets of parent-child relationships. Describes how the children are similar to their parents in outlook, character and behavior.
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Essay Grade: 83%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Racial and Social Prejudice
1,032 words, approx. 3 pages
Harper Lee expressed the main theme of prejudice in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird by illustrating both racial and social prejudice. The title of the novel refers not only to Atticus' explanation of killing a mockingbird being a sin, but also to the novel's characters who were persecuted simply for being different from everyone else.
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Essay Grade: 88%
An Examination of Prejudice As Depicted in To Kill a Mockingbird
1,028 words, approx. 3 pages
Discusses the theme of prejudice in Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird. Also discusses the use, meaning and importance of the mockingbird as a symbol.
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Essay Grade: 92%
A Critical Analysis of "To Kill a Mockingbird"
1,026 words, approx. 3 pages
This is a critical analysis of the book "To Kill a Mockingbird." It shows how Harper Lee accurately depicts small town southern life in Alabama.
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Essay Grade: 82%
Personal Growth To Kill a Mockingbird Style
1,025 words, approx. 3 pages
An essay on personal experience demonstrating personal growth in the form as if told by Scout from Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird.
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Essay Grade: 81%
The Role of Education in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
1,021 words, approx. 3 pages
In Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird," the author's story reveals her thoughts about the deficiencies of the American educational system. In the story, the schools favor city children over children raised in rural settings.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Miss Maudie Atkinson
1,014 words, approx. 3 pages
Miss Maudie Atkinson is the neighbor of Atticus Finch in Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird. She is a kind, generous, cheerful, respectful, and loyal lady who serves as a strong member of the community and stands up to the rudeness of Miss Stephanie Crawford, the town gossip.
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Essay Grade: 96%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Themes of Prejudice
1,007 words, approx. 3 pages
It decribes the different themes of prejudice throughout Harper Lee's famous novel, 'To Kill A Mockingbird'.
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Essay Grade: 89%
Why Is the Novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" Important?
1,002 words, approx. 3 pages
Essay discusses why the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" is important.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Education in "to Kill a Mockingbird"
995 words, approx. 3 pages
This essay describes and compares the characters in Harper Lee's novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" and discusses how their varying levels of education affected the role in the story.
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Essay Grade: 83%
Book Report To Kill A Mockingbird
992 words, approx. 3 pages
Analysis of To Kill A Mockingbird. Critqued as well.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Boo Radley: Mystery Man
990 words, approx. 3 pages
This essay deals with the fact and fiction about Boo Radley in "To Kill a Mockingbird." It also includes the way the children view Boo and the reality behind him.
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Essay Grade: 90%
To Kill a Mockingbird
985 words, approx. 3 pages
How Jem and Scout were influenced by the events in Maycomb in "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 92%
To Kill a Mockingbird Literary Analysis on Atticus
981 words, approx. 3 pages
Essay provides a character analysis of Atticus from "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Life Lessons in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
980 words, approx. 3 pages
The characters of Jem and Scout learn valuable life lessons in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird." From their father, Atticus, they learn about courage and how to use words instead of violence to solve problems.
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Essay Grade: 81%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Scout Finch
980 words, approx. 3 pages
To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, is a story of prejudice and class distinction in the south in the 1930s. Lee uses Scout finch, a young girl, as the narrator of the story to show the injustice in Maycomb county society. Throughout the book Scout often wonders why people can't all just get along.
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Essay Grade: 96%
Definition of Courage in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
975 words, approx. 3 pages
Discusses how the definition of courage changes and develops in the course of the novel "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 88%
"To Kill a Mockingbird": How One Person's Actions can Change Society
974 words, approx. 3 pages
A "To Kill a Mockingbird" essay, emphasizing how the Atticus Finch character's actions changed society's view about African-Americans.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Prejudice and Segregation in "To Kill a Mockingbird" and "X-Men"
973 words, approx. 3 pages
Prejudice and segregation are themes found in both the classic novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee and the film "X-Men" directed by Bryan Singer. Violence in both works show the inequality between classes of people.
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Essay Grade: 83%
Plot Summary and Character Analysis of "To Kill a Mockingbird"
971 words, approx. 3 pages
Plot summary of Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird" and descriptions of some of the main characters, especially Scout.
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Essay Grade: 86%
A Character Study of Atticus Finch
970 words, approx. 3 pages
Evaluates the character of Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird, a novel by Harper Lee. Describes his internal conflicts and characteristics which make him one of the best characters in American literature.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird and The Scottsboro Boys Trial
968 words, approx. 3 pages
The fictional trial of Tom Robinson, a character from To Kill a Mockingbird, is in many ways similar to the factual trial of the Scottsboro Boys. The two trials share similarities in their setting, characters, and outcomes.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Atticus is a Good Father in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
966 words, approx. 3 pages
Why Atticus is a great father in "To Kill a Mockingbird," the classic novel by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 96%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Courage
960 words, approx. 3 pages
Essay discusses the aspect of courage in the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 81%
Discrimination in to Kill a Mockingbird
951 words, approx. 3 pages
Harper Lee uses different rhetorical devices in To Kill a Mockingbird to show that discrimination is wrong. By comparing the black and white races throughout her novel with parallelism, she shows how much they both have in common and demonstrates that discrimination is unfair because of these similarities.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Prejudice in American Literature
947 words, approx. 3 pages
Compares the theme of prejudice in Toni Cade Bambara's short story, "Blues Ain't No Mockingbird," Susan Glaspell's, "A Jury of Her Peers," and Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. Discusses how racial and gender bias keeps society from reaching its full potential.
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Essay Grade: 89%
Prejudism in the Novel "To Kill a Mockingbird"
944 words, approx. 3 pages
This essay portrays the prejudism in the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 92%
Atticus Finch
937 words, approx. 3 pages
Essay provides an analysis of Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 86%
Character Analysis of Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird
933 words, approx. 3 pages
Detailed Character Analysis for important characters of "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 96%
Lessons about Life in "To Kill a Mocking Bird"
932 words, approx. 3 pages
Analyzes some of the life lessons learned by the children in Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mocking Bird."
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Essay Grade: 83%
Atticus Finch and Bob Ewell as Parents in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
929 words, approx. 3 pages
In "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, Atticus Finch's courage show through as a parent, showing caring and wisdom. Bob Ewell, on the other hand, is a drunken partent who is abusive and cowardly.
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Essay Grade: 81%
The "Mockingbirds" in To Kill a Mockingbird
927 words, approx. 3 pages
The title of Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird is significant in that while it is considered a sin to kill a mockingbird, characters in the story resemble mockingbirds that have indeed been "killed." Atticus Finch, Tom Robinson, and Boo Radley are all characters whose experiences in the novel strongly identify with the title; Atticus because he is criticized for defending Tom; Tom because he is a victim of racial prejudice; and Boo because he is a victim of stereotyping.
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Essay Grade: 93%
The Sin of Killing Mockingbirds
926 words, approx. 3 pages
The following is a comparison of the Tom Robinson and Arthur Radley story lines in relation to the mockingbird symbol.
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Essay Grade: 89%
Why Is a Novel Such as to Kill a Mockingbird Important to Read?
923 words, approx. 3 pages
It's about why it is important to read. It's on discrimination, racism, prejudice, courage, and loneliness.

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Essay Grade: 85%
To Kill a Mockingbird -- Coming of Age
920 words, approx. 3 pages
Essay deals with the "coming of age" theme presented in the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird.
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Essay Grade: 91%
Chapter 22 of "To Kill a Mockingbird"
916 words, approx. 3 pages
This essay deals with the themes of chapter 22 in "To Kill a Mocking Bird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Courage in to Kill Mockingbird
911 words, approx. 3 pages
The novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee shows both moral and physical courage. The idea of courage takes different forms in the story. The truest challenge to anyone's courage was the Radley house, Atticus as parent showed both aspects of courage and tried to get it through his children and "the real courage" in the novel was shown by Mrs. Dubose. The idea of courage was quiet important in the novel and it was expressed in a number of ways.
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Essay Grade: 88%
The Theme of Courage in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
911 words, approx. 3 pages
Moral and physical courage is a key theme in the classic novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 78%
Jem's Maturity in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
909 words, approx. 3 pages
In "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, the character of Jem must deal with many adversities that help him grow into a mature adult.
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Essay Grade: 83%
The Moral Growth of the Children in to Kill a Mockingbird
881 words, approx. 3 pages
Examines the moral and spiritual growth of both Scout and Jem, the children in Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird. Demonstrates how each of the children changed their attitudes towards the true meaning of courage.
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Essay Grade: 86%
The Maternal Role of Calpurnia in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
876 words, approx. 3 pages
In the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, Calpurnia played a much more important role then just to clean and cook. She was an important material figure for the Finches.
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Essay Grade: 83%
Literary Prejudice and Discrimination
871 words, approx. 3 pages
Explores themes of prejudice and discrimination in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Compares the fictional trial of Tom Robinson to that of Leo Frank Case, charged with the murder of Mary Phagan.
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Essay Grade: 78%
Heroism of Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird
865 words, approx. 3 pages
Atticus Finch is a heroic character in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird because of the qualities he displayed as well as his various achievements. He cared for and defended a black man in court against the prejudices of his community; he proved his abilities and intelligence, and he cared for everybody equally.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Analyzing Dill
864 words, approx. 3 pages
Examines Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird. Performs a character analysis of Dill. Explores his role in the story.
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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mockingbird, Summary of Chapters 21-31
862 words, approx. 3 pages
Summarizes chapters 21-31 of Harper Lee's novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. Begins at the reading of the verdict against Tom Robinson.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Prejudice in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
855 words, approx. 3 pages
Three types of prejudice can be seen in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird": racial, social and religious. Education, as shown in the character of Atticus, is portrayed as a way to battle ignorance and bigotry.
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Essay Grade: 75%
Relating To Kill a Mockingbird to Modern Times
855 words, approx. 3 pages
As Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird is a story of racism, bigotry, and hate, one can draw a connection between the 1930s story and the events of the present day, particularly since September 11, 2001. Because the warning of the novel regarding persecution on the basis of prejudice has not been pursued, the consequences in both the novel and the present day have been similar.
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Essay Grade: 78%
Atticus Vs. Ewell
854 words, approx. 3 pages
Atticus was a great loving and caring father to his children whereas Mr.Ewell was a father who didn't want anything to do with his children. Atticus would definitely be chosen as the better father and role model.
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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mocking Bird, A Reading Pleasure
850 words, approx. 3 pages
Discusses the Harper Lee novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. Describes why the text is a pleasure to read. Details five specific points, all involving the characters Scout and Jem.
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Essay Grade: 83%
To Kill a Mocking Bird
850 words, approx. 3 pages
In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee deliberately demonstrates the effects of what happens when different people are placed under pressure. She has created certain characters, each with their own personal identity, placed them under the same pressured circumstance, and has prepared outcomes and reactions differing from character to character.
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Essay Grade: 83%
Authors Complex View of Southern Women
849 words, approx. 3 pages
Explains the complex views of Harper Lee regarding Southern women by looking at the various female characters she presents in the novel "To Kill A Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 86%
Real and False Heroism in "To Kill a Mockingbird" and Other Texts
847 words, approx. 3 pages
Heroism has been demeaned by a media that praises unworthy heros. This theme is explored in "We can be Hereos," a film by Laura Waters. True heroism is the type described in Harper Lee's novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" or the real-life heroism of the man who stood up to tanks in Tiananmen Square in 1989.
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Essay Grade: 88%
"To Kill a Mockingbird", "The Catcher in the Rye", and "The Gathering"
843 words, approx. 3 pages
Examines the themes of survival, life's struggle and youth in "To Kill a Mockingbird", by Harper Lee; "The Catcher in the Rye", by J.D. Salinger; and "The Gathering", by Isobelle Carmody.
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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mocking Bird: Parental Influence
838 words, approx. 3 pages
Demonstrates the affect of parents influence on their children based on Atticus Finch and Bob Ewell.
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Essay Grade: 92%
The Prejudices of "To Kill a Mockingbird"
838 words, approx. 3 pages
This a brief and somewhat superficial look at the prejudices in "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Racism in "The Power of One" and "To Kill a Mockingbird"
837 words, approx. 3 pages
The theme of racism in "The Power Of One" by Bryce Courtenay and "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee. This essay revolves around the theme of injustice and what similarities and differences both books have with each other in conveying the issue of injustice.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Central Theme and Message of "To Kill a Mockingbird"
827 words, approx. 3 pages
Essay discusses how prejudice is the central theme and message of "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Parenting Skills of Atticus Finch
823 words, approx. 3 pages
Essay discusses the parenting skills of Atticus Finch in "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 91%
To Kill a Mockingbird Vs. Romeo and Juliet
823 words, approx. 3 pages
Compares Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" with Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare.
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Essay Grade: 78%
Atticusfinch and Bob Ewell as My Foil Characters
821 words, approx. 3 pages
A comparison of Atticus Finch and Bob Ewell reveals striking similarities, yet strong differences as well. Both address social issues.
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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mockingbird: An Analysis of Aticus Finch's Speech
821 words, approx. 3 pages
Discusses the Harper Lee novel, To Kill A Mockingbird. Examines the importance of main character Atticus Finch's speech before the jury in the Tom Robinson trial.
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Essay Grade: 81%
Atticus Finch Was a Role Model Ahead of His Time
819 words, approx. 3 pages
Atticus Finch a citizen of Maycomb during the 1930's was a role model ahead of his time. He had some advanced beliefs on life with the following downfall; the people of Maycomb simply did not understand these futuristic thoughts he possessed.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird - The Definition of Courage
810 words, approx. 3 pages
Explores Harper Lee's novel, To Kill A Mocking Bird. Considers how main character Atticus Finch embodies the definition of courage.
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Essay Grade: 75%
To Kill a Mocking Bird Moral Evaluation Essay
809 words, approx. 3 pages
A psychologist named Lawrence Kohlberg made a model of moral development explaining what motivates a person to act as he or she does and there are six levels to his model. It related to the characters in "to Kill a Mockingbird" and how these stages are applied to these characters.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Scout is the Most Important Character
797 words, approx. 3 pages
Essay shows how Scout is the most important character in the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 83%
The Mockingbird Theme
790 words, approx. 3 pages
The mockingbird, a harmless, innocent bird that sings to us, and generally makes the world a more pleasant place. In `To Kill A Mockingbird', the mockingbird symbolizes two main characters, Boo Radley, and Tom Robinson. These were two innocent men, who never did anyone harm.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Scout's Life Lessons in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
787 words, approx. 3 pages
The challenging life that 8-year-old Scout must face in "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee helps her mature and teaches her important life lessons about racism, kindness and the value of education. Scout matures from a young, naive girl into an intellectual young lady who understands life's challenges.
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Essay Grade: 89%
To Kill a Mockingbird: A Tour of Maycomb from Scout's Point of View
783 words, approx. 3 pages
THis essay is about the town of Maycomb, from "To Kill a Mockingbird," capturing the tone and character of Scout- as it is told from his point of view.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Scout Finch in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
781 words, approx. 3 pages
Shows how the experiences and behaviour of Scout Finch in "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Less are important in developing the message of the novel.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Steps to Maturity: Scout in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
773 words, approx. 3 pages
In Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird," the character of Scout, Atticus's daughter, matures through three events: Aunt Alexandra comes to live with the family; Atticus loses a trial; and she and Jem are attacked by Mr. Ewell.
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Essay Grade: 83%
Education and Growing Up
772 words, approx. 3 pages
In the story To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, three children named Jem, Scout, and Dill learns very important things that will lead to growing up in way that they wouldn't experience at school. Through the many events happening to each of them during the Tom Robinson trial and the gossips around Boo Radley, they each gains separate insights to the society in the small town of Maycomb.
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Essay Grade: 85%
Atticus Finch: A Man of Wisdon and Courage
765 words, approx. 3 pages
Essay explains how Atticus Finch, one of the main characters in the story "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, explores the themes of courage and wisdom.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mokingbird
763 words, approx. 3 pages
Reviews the novel To Kill A Mockinbird, by Harper Lee. Discusses the major theme of prejudice. Analyzes the symbolism of the mockingbird as it relates to major characters.
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Essay Grade: 94%
To Kill a Mocking Bird: Tom Is Not Guilty
760 words, approx. 3 pages
Essay is an argument to convince the judge that Tom Robinson is innocent in the novel "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 83%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Characters That Taught Scout Finch Lessons
760 words, approx. 3 pages
In Harper Lee's To Kill a Mocking Bird, several characters teach Scout Finch valuable lessons. The influence of Calpurnia, Arthur Radley and Atticus Finch all helped Scout to become a civilized young woman.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Prejudice in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
757 words, approx. 3 pages
This essay explains the purpose of having a young, innocent, unbiased child as narrator of the story.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Courage or Cowardice?
752 words, approx. 3 pages
Courage becomes not only true to this story, but also applicable to life outside To Kill A Mockingbird. The attitudes of Jem and Scout are used to show true key elements of courage. Lessons taught by Atticus and Mrs. Dubose show Jem and Scout fine examples of courage and hence teaching the children to stand up for your rights no matter what. These mentors are vital not only to Jem and Scout, but also to the reader.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Good Vs. Evil in To Kill a Mockingbird
749 words, approx. 3 pages
Examines the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. Divides the characters into two groups, good and evil. Describes how, through their actions, each character exhibits good or evil traits.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Symbolism of Mockingbirds in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
748 words, approx. 3 pages
In "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, mockingbirds represent people who have done nothing wrong but who are harmed by society. Atticus Finch, Boo Radley and Tom Robinson represent mockingbirds because they are persecuted unjustly by a racist community.
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Essay Grade: 87%
To Kill a Mockingbird Vs. Lord of the Flies
747 words, approx. 3 pages
Compares "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harvey Lee with "Lord of the Flies" by William Golding.
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Essay Grade: 78%
Comparison of Memoirs of a Geisha and To Kill a Mockingbird
745 words, approx. 3 pages
A comparison of the novels Memoirs of a Geisha, by Arthur Golden, and To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. While these novels seem as if they have nothing in common, there are similarities between the two along with the differences. Both stories are about life and happiness; both are told in first-person point of view; and both portray the importance of young girls becoming ladies.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbrid, A Summary and Review
737 words, approx. 3 pages
Discusses the film version of the Harper Lee novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, directed of Robert Mulligan. Summarizes the film's plot and discusses the moral lessons actor Gregory Peck, as Atticus Finch, teaches to his children.
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Essay Grade: 83%
"father Always Knows Best"
734 words, approx. 2 pages
Atticus Finch in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" isn't perfect, but he serves as a perfect role model for his two children, Scout and Jem. He is a hero because he is brave, loving and caring, and because he fights for justice.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Calpurnia as a Mother
729 words, approx. 2 pages
Essay discusses how Calpurnia plays the role of a mother in "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 83%
The Theme of Courage In To Kill a Mockingbird
724 words, approx. 2 pages
Provides an analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird, a novel by Harper Lee. Examines how the two children in the novel, Jem and Scout, come to reevaluate their attitude towards the meaning of courage. Details how the characters come to view courage as a psychological rather than a physical trait.
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Essay Grade: 81%
To Kill a Mockingbird
723 words, approx. 2 pages
Essay discusses the changes that occure in the lives of Jem and Scouts in To Kill a Mockingbird.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Themes in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
713 words, approx. 2 pages
Essay examines the presence of many themes in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 78%
"To Kill a Mockingbird"
706 words, approx. 2 pages
The book To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is about a girl named Scout and her brother, Jem, who grows up in Maycomb County a time when racism was very common in Alabama.
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Essay Grade: 83%
Compare To Kill a Mockingbird and The Scarlet Letter
705 words, approx. 2 pages
John Steinbeck was correct when he declared, "It is the responsibility of the writer to expose...our dark and dangerous dreams, for the purpose of improvement." We must be able to face our own societal shortcomings in order to work toward a better future. Two novels, The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne and To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, exemplify this sentiment.
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Essay Grade: 92%
The Mockingbird
699 words, approx. 2 pages
This essay discusses the meaning of the "mockingbird" in Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 81%
Courage within to Kill a Mockingbird
697 words, approx. 2 pages
The concept of courage in To Kill A Mockingbird is not only true to this story, but also applicable to life outside this story. The attitudes of Jem and Scout are used to show true key elements of courage. Lessons taught by Atticus and Mrs. Dubose show Jem and Scout what it is to be courageous and stand up for what they believe in. These mentors are vital not only to Jem and Scout, but to the reader.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Role of Race in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
695 words, approx. 2 pages
Book review and analysis of race in "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 92%
Victims in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
694 words, approx. 2 pages
Essay explores the victims in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 86%
Common Themes of "To Kill a Mockingbird," "Sometimes My Body Leaves Me," and "Holy Sonnet 10"
693 words, approx. 2 pages
Common themes found in three works of literature: "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, "Sometimes My Body Leaves Me" by Lorna Crozier, and "Holy Sonnet 10" by John Donne. The themes are misery, love's ability to overcome hardship, and justice and injustice.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Courage in To Kill a Mockingbird
692 words, approx. 2 pages
Discusses the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. Explores the courage of main character Atticus Finch.
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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mockingbird Vs Remember the Titans
690 words, approx. 2 pages
Compares the Harper Lee novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, to the film Remember the Titans. Discusses the issue of optimism vs. pessimism. Describes how the opposite outlooks had contradictory affects on the minds and emotions of their readers and viewers.
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Essay Grade: 78%
To Kill a Mockingbird - Life Lessons
687 words, approx. 2 pages
Positive parent figures in "To Kill a Mockingbird" are prominent in the novel as they are in real life. Scout matured greatly as she soaked in the life lessons she learned from positive parent figures such as Calpurnia and Aunt Alexandra.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Racism and Prejudice in to Kill a Mockingbird
674 words, approx. 2 pages
Analyzes Harper Lee's novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. Discusses the racial comments and prejudice throughout the award winning novel. Relates the literary events to historical events in the 1930s in America.
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Essay Grade: 88%
The Character of Scout in "To Kill A Mockingbird"
672 words, approx. 2 pages
How the character of Scout Scout deal with just and unjust individuals in the classic novel, "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird - Analyzing Atticus
671 words, approx. 2 pages
Analyzes the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. Focuses on the character Atticus Finch. Discusses his importance in the novel and his relationship with his children.
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Essay Grade: 83%
Racism in to Kill a Mockingbird
670 words, approx. 2 pages
Explores the themes of racism and ignorance in Harper Lee's classic novel, To Kill A Mockingbird. Explains how the residents of Maycomb exhibit those themes.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Prejudice in the Book "to Kill a Mockingbird"
666 words, approx. 2 pages
This essay describes prejudice in the book "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 75%
To Kill a Mockingbird
660 words, approx. 2 pages
A personal opinion of Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird, a strong, inspiring novel that displays many important ideas about society.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Racism in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
659 words, approx. 2 pages
This essay is about the effects of racism on the town of Maycomb, Alabama in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 87%
Scout's Characteristics
655 words, approx. 2 pages
Describes the qualities of the character of Scout Finch from the novel "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Courage in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
652 words, approx. 2 pages
In "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, Scout learns that courage is doing the right thing during bad circumstances, not being physically courageous in a fight. She grows to appreciate the courageous quality of Atticus, her father.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird
639 words, approx. 2 pages
This is an essay about family values in the novel 'To Kill a Mockingbird' by Harper Lee
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Essay Grade: 92%
To Kill A Mockingbird-Jem Character Analysis
639 words, approx. 2 pages
A short 5 paragraph essay on Jem, the young boy in the novel 'To Kill A Mockingbird'. A Character Analysis, with quotes.
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Essay Grade: 78%
Good Example of the Saying, "they Grow Up So Fast"
638 words, approx. 2 pages
The analysis of Jem Finch's maturing in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird.
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Essay Grade: 83%
A Sin to Kill a Mockingbird
635 words, approx. 2 pages
In her novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee portrays Boo Radley, Scout, and Tom Robinson as mockingbirds, because all three were unfairly attacked in one way or another. Boo Radley was verbally attacked, Scout was physically attacked, and Tom Robinson was both deceived and physically attacked.
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Essay Grade: 83%
Atticus in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird
631 words, approx. 2 pages
An analysis of the character Atticus Finch in Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird. A well-respected, courteous, and sincere man, Atticus was not only a loving father to his children Jem and Scout, but he also remained true to his conscience even when everyone else opposed his views.
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Essay Grade: 92%
The Symbolic Mockingbird
631 words, approx. 2 pages
Essay describes the symbolism of the mockingbird in "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Analysis of "To Kill a Mockingbird"
621 words, approx. 2 pages
Essay provides an analysis of "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Complacency
620 words, approx. 2 pages
Analyzes the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. Discusses the negative effects of complacency, as depicted in the novel. Argues that ignorance is the ultimate cause of complacency, and changes that could better society cannot be made because of close-minded people who are complacent.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird, an Analysis of Atticus Finch
619 words, approx. 2 pages
Discusses the novel To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. Analyzes the character of Atticus Finch. Examines his empathetic nature.
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Essay Grade: 79%
To Kill a Mockingbird Journal Entry
619 words, approx. 2 pages
Essay is a diary entry as the character "Scout" from "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 84%
To Kill a Mockingbird - Boo (Arthur Radley)
613 words, approx. 2 pages
Discusses the character of Boo.
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Essay Grade: 88%
The Role of Atticus inTo Kill a Mocking Bird
612 words, approx. 2 pages
Description of Atticus' vital role in discrediting racism and prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird.
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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mockingbird: What Scout Learned
611 words, approx. 2 pages
In Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, the character Scout Finch learns much and changes greatly as the result of the trial and conviction of Tom Robinson, who was represented by her attorney father Atticus Finch. Scout learns about the negative impact of prejudice, the importance of forgiveness, and the skepticism with which one should accept gossip or rumor.
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Essay Grade: 85%
To Kill a Mockingbird
609 words, approx. 2 pages
A comprehensive essay on the book "To Kill A Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 92%
Symbolism in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
609 words, approx. 2 pages
Important symbolism in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" include the mockingbird as peace and lost innocence, guns as symbols of power and persecution, and killing of a rabid dog as eradicating prejudice.
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Essay Grade: 90%
Tom Robinson's Bravery
606 words, approx. 2 pages
This is an essay about the character of Tom Robinson from the book "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 86%
The Mad Dog Incident in To Kill a Mockingbird
602 words, approx. 2 pages
Describes how the mad dog incident changed the relationship between Atticus and Scout in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Explores how the incident changed Atticus in Scout's eyes.
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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mockingbird - Character Analysis of Atticus Finch
596 words, approx. 2 pages
Essay consists of a character analysis of Atticus Finch from the novel "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Kill a Mockingbird
596 words, approx. 2 pages
Examines major themes from the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Describes how Harper Lee relates to the theme reaching beyond oneself by simply using literary elements such as point of view. Summarizes the story's plot.
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Essay Grade: 78%
It's a Sin to Kill a Mockingbird...
586 words, approx. 2 pages
To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee is about a loving family, which consists of one father and his two children, Jem and Scout, who experience the good and evil in people. "Mockingbirds" are the symbols of good, innocent people who do nothing wrong, but are destroyed by evil. The two main mockingbirds of this novel are Tom Robinson and Boo Radley.
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Essay Grade: 83%
Atticus' Parenting Skills
581 words, approx. 2 pages
In the story, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, Atticus is one of those `ideal fathers.' Atticus is a single father raising his two children, Scout and Jem, and doing a great job too.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Courage and to Kill a Mockingbird
581 words, approx. 2 pages
This essay explains the theme of courage in Harper Lee To Kill a Mockingbird.
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Essay Grade: 83%
Sin of Killing a Mockingbird
579 words, approx. 2 pages
A mockingbird is an innocent animal that sings a soothing tune. People often sit on their front porch and enjoy this melody, yet these birds are punished for doing no wrong. It is considered a sin to kill mockingbirds because they are so tranquil. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, author Harper Lee paints a picture in readers' minds of killing this flawless creature of nature.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Boo Radley
576 words, approx. 2 pages
Discusses the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. Analyzes the character of Boo Radle. Considers how the reader's opinion of the character changes along with the story.
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Essay Grade: 87%
Justice in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
573 words, approx. 2 pages
Harper Lee shows that justice is flawed through the classic novel "To Kill A Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mockingbird Critical Review
564 words, approx. 2 pages
Literature analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
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Essay Grade: 75%
The Scottboro Case
561 words, approx. 2 pages
An overview of the Scottsboro Case, in which nine innocent African-American boys were accused of raping two white girls. It includes a tie back to the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Courage in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
556 words, approx. 2 pages
Scout, Jem, Atticus, and Mrs. Dubose each exhibit different types of courage in Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 86%
Scout's Impact as Narrator in To Kill a Mockingbird
555 words, approx. 2 pages
This essay explores how the telling of the story To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, is affected by its narrator, Scout. Scout's youth and skewed views make her version of events questionable; the author uses other devices to help the reader understand the truth.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Theme Analysis
554 words, approx. 2 pages
Discusses the Harper Lee novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. Explores the major theme of racism, especially as depicted in the Tom Robinson trial.
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Essay Grade: 75%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Significance of the Title
554 words, approx. 2 pages
The title of the 1960 Harper Lee novel To Kill a Mockingbird serves as a metaphor that also serves as a warning to judge on the content of one's soul, rather than what one may see at first glance. The reader is told during the story that killing a mockingbird is a sin; although a mockingbird was never actually killed in the story, someone as innocent as the mockingbird, Tom Robinson, was struck down brutally due to prejudice and bigotry.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird
548 words, approx. 2 pages
Throughout To Kill a Mockingbird the characters of Scout and Jem grow a great deal due to the pressures of being innocent and being considered "mockingbirds", Tom Robinson's trial, and their first encounter with Boo Radley.
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Essay Grade: 92%
3 Lessons Scout Learns in to Kill a Mockingbird
548 words, approx. 2 pages
Harper Lee's Novel To Kill a Mockingbird overflows with many of life's important lessons. Three of the most significant lessons learned by Scout during the course of the story are courage, acceptance, and respect.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Summary of the Court Scene in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
541 words, approx. 2 pages
A summary of the court scene in "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 88%
The Courtroom Scene: Chapters 17-18
540 words, approx. 2 pages
A short summary of the Courtroom Scene in "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 78%
Courage in to Kill a Mockingbird
535 words, approx. 2 pages
Atticus Finch, the main character in Harper Lee's story To Kill a Mockingbird, personifies the story's theme of courage. Lee reveals courage through Atticus' actions, as well as through her use of symbolism and imagery.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Damsels in Distress in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
535 words, approx. 2 pages
Essay discusses the Gothic motif element in "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Good and Evil in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
534 words, approx. 2 pages
Essay discusses the aspects of good and evil in "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 88%
Life Lessons for Jem and Scout in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
534 words, approx. 2 pages
The Atticus Finch character teaches important life lessons to his children, Jem and Scout, in Harper Lee's classic novel, "To Kill a Mockingbird." The children learn to repsect guests in the home and elders, regardless of how society treats them. This shows in the Finchs' kind treatment of Tom and the maid.
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Essay Grade: 87%
To Kill a Mockingbird
529 words, approx. 2 pages
Essay is a comparison between myself and the character of Atticus in the novel "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 75%
Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird
524 words, approx. 2 pages
A synopsis of the prejudice illustrated by the town of Maycomb in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. An important example of prejudice in this case is the fact that an honest black man's word in court would not be taken over a guilty white man's word.
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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mockingbird
522 words, approx. 2 pages
Discusses the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. Examines the consequences relating to the conviction of character Tom Robinson. Explores the major theme of racism.
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Essay Grade: 83%
The Emotional Growth of the Children in To Kill a Mockingbird
520 words, approx. 2 pages
Provides a character analysis of Jem and Scout, the children in Harper Lee's novel about racism, To Kill a Mockingbird. Explores the themes of maturity and growing up.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird and Remember the Titans
519 words, approx. 2 pages
Both the novel To Kill a Mockingbird and the movie "Remember the Titans" address the problems associated with racism, with both narrators expressing opposition to it. The most important theme expressed in both stories is that one should always stand up for his/her beliefs, regardless of the level of opposition to them.
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Essay Grade: 78%
To Kill a Mockingbird
519 words, approx. 2 pages
Discusses Harper Lee's book "To Kill a Mockingbird", examining how different families in the story handle conflict. Keywords: family, psychology, conflict, conflict resolution
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Essay Grade: 88%
True Courage in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
518 words, approx. 2 pages
How courage is defined by Atticus and interpreted by Jem and Scout in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird." It is shown in the novel that people can be courageous in different ways, yet all forms of courage are individually relevant and provide positive contributions to society.
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Essay Grade: 81%
Prejudice
517 words, approx. 2 pages
In the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird", Harper Lee presents several examples of prejudice on three different levels, socially, racially, and religiously.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird
517 words, approx. 2 pages
Essay is about how the characters in the book "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, who are left out of the movie, are an important part of the book and should be in the movie.
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Essay Grade: 88%
The Real Mockingbirds
514 words, approx. 2 pages
Essay discusses what the mockingbird symbolizes.
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Essay Grade: 83%
The Role of Atticus Finch and His Parenting in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird
512 words, approx. 2 pages
A look at how Atticus uses different ways of parenting in Haper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. His efforts help Jem and Scout to understand prejudice and to see that sometimes life is unfair.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Analysis of the Atticus Character in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
510 words, approx. 2 pages
In "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, Scout and Jem grow up thinking that their lawyer father, Atticus, is not remarkable in any way. The children gain respect for him after he heroically kills a mad dog, and they go on to learn many lessons from him about bravery, courage and perseverance.
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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Values
506 words, approx. 2 pages
This essay discusses the values Atticus wants to teach his kids throughout the book "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Prejudice in to Kill a Mockingbird
506 words, approx. 2 pages
Analysis of the theme of prejudice in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird. Provides a short summary of the novel's plot. Discusses various forms of prejudice depicted in the novel.
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Essay Grade: 83%
Harper Lee's Use of Humor in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
502 words, approx. 2 pages
Harper Lee uses a great deal of humor in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird, most of which is satirical in nature. Lee uses humor to describe certain traits of various characters, and she chooses indirect yet humorous ways to describe thoughts and actions among the characters.
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Essay Grade: 78%
Life Lessons Learned from To Kill a Mocking Bird
500 words, approx. 2 pages
The life lessons that we learned in `To Kill a Mockingbird' are the same as the lessons that Jem and Scout learned from their development of growth and experience. Racism, gender issues, societal values and prejudging are all part of their environment. We hope they are not as prevalent today.
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Essay Grade: 83%
To Kill a Mockingbird - Symbolism
498 words, approx. 2 pages
The symbolism in Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird reveals the citizens of Maycomb in terms of their prejudice, their fears, and their acts of dishonesty. The snowman, the fire in Miss Maudie Atkinson's house, and the mockingbird are all examples of symbolism in the story.
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Essay Grade: 86%
The Good and Bad Qualities of a Person as Displayed in To Kill a Mockingbird
497 words, approx. 2 pages
An important theme of Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird is that both good and evil qualities can coexist in the same person. Both Boo Radley and Mrs. Dubose display the good side of their personalities at different points in the novel, disspelling Scout and Jem's belief that both were evil and incapable of doing good.
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Essay Grade: 88%
The Use of Grammar in To Kill a Mockingbird
494 words, approx. 2 pages
In To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee used the local language and grammar that would have been used in the South at that time in history and that would be true to the characters in the book. She used adjectives describing characters and events that not only belonged to the times, but that also would show the reader exactly what was meant. This approach to grammar worked because the focus of the story is told from Scout's viewpoint and through Scout's interactions with those around her.
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Essay Grade: 78%
Atticus Finch's Character
494 words, approx. 2 pages
In To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, Atticus Finch as a character can be hard to decipher at times, although by the end of the book the reader fully understands most of his characteristics. He is an honest, although somewhat secretive man.
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Essay Grade: 81%
Scout in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
492 words, approx. 2 pages
A character sketch on Scout from Harper Lee's novel "To Kill a Mockingbird." A tomboy in a small town whose residents were caught up in old traditions, Scout tries to find herself and where she fits in the world. She learns the importance of being true to her heart and her beliefs rather than what others may think.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Influences on Scout
489 words, approx. 2 pages
Explores the Harper Lee novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. Describes the influence from Calpurnia on Scout. Details how Calpurnia has affected Scout's growth by teaching her many things about their society.
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Essay Grade: 83%
To Kill a Mockingbird, an Analysis of Chapters 1-5
488 words, approx. 2 pages
Examines chapters 1-5 of the book To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. Describes the character of Atticus Finch.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird
483 words, approx. 2 pages
Essay provides an analysis of "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 88%
The Traits of Jem Finch
473 words, approx. 2 pages
Essay offers a character analysis of Jem Finch from the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 88%
Prejudice in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
471 words, approx. 2 pages
Essay is about the different kinds of prejudice in Harper Lee's story "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 75%
"To Kill a Mockingbird": a Character Sketch of Atticus Finch
468 words, approx. 2 pages
Attiucs Finch was a loving father of two, a son Jeremy (Jem), and a daughter Jean Louise (Scout). Attiucs was an honorable defense lawyer for his town and part of the State Legislative. Atticus accepts a case for an accused black rapist, Tom Robinson. Atticus has more than just Tom Robinson to defend; he must defend his self morals and family in "To Kill a Mockingbird," by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 89%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Tom Robinson Should Not Be Guilty
468 words, approx. 2 pages
This essay is about why Tom Robinson from "To Kill a Mockingbird" should not be guilty.
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Essay Grade: 83%
Protesting Against Social Injustice
467 words, approx. 2 pages
Describes the differences between The Crucible by Arthur Miller and To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 92%
Courage in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
457 words, approx. 2 pages
This essay examines the subject of courage in the book "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 81%
Atticus Finch: a Just Man
443 words, approx. 2 pages
Provides an analysis of Atticus Finch, a character in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. Explains why Finch is one of the best male role models in American Literature.
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Essay Grade: 83%
To Kill a Mockingbird
442 words, approx. 2 pages
Reviews the book, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. Explores the evolution of the character Scout. Describes how she learns many of life's lessons.
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Essay Grade: 84%
To Kill a Mocking Bird by Harper Lee
437 words, approx. 2 pages
Opinion on what Harper Lee's point that he wanted to tell to his readers.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Prejudice in "To Kill a Mockinbird"
433 words, approx. 1 pages
My essay is about prejudice in the book "To Kill a Mockingbird." It talks about the prejudice against Tom Robinson, Dolphus Raymond, and others.
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Essay Grade: 90%
To Kill a Mockingbird
432 words, approx. 1 pages
the characters in To Kill a Mockingbird
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Essay Grade: 78%
Jem's explanation about Scout
431 words, approx. 1 pages
This is an essay about Jem explaning his sister Scout in To Kill A Mockingbird. It is done from the perspective that the person writing the essay is the character in the work.
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Essay Grade: 90%
To Kill A Mockingbird
418 words, approx. 1 pages
Essay provides a literary analysis of the novel "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 87%
To Kill a Mockingbird
417 words, approx. 1 pages
Essay discusses the use of symbolism of the mockingbirds in "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird
416 words, approx. 1 pages
A look at the racial prejudices in the book "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mockingbird
410 words, approx. 1 pages
Essay provides a discussion of Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 86%
Prejudice in "To Kill a Mockinbird"
410 words, approx. 1 pages
It is about Prejudice in "To Kill a Mockingbird" written by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 86%
"Killing" Mockingbirds
410 words, approx. 1 pages
Discusses the Harper Lee novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. Summarizes the story's plot. Analyzes the character Atticus Finch. Describes how Atticus interacts with the two "mockingbirds," other characters in the novel.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Character Analysis of Atticus Finch
408 words, approx. 1 pages
Essay discusses the character of Atticus Finch in the novel "To Kill a Mocking Bird" by Harper Lee.

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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mockingbird
407 words, approx. 1 pages
Essay discusses the racial differences in the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 87%
"To Kill A Mockingbird": How the Reader's Attention Is Captured
406 words, approx. 1 pages

This essay deals with the techniques used to capture the reader's attention and compel them to read on in "To Kill a Mocking Bird" Harper Lee.

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Essay Grade: 88%
Scout and Jem Are Being Watched
395 words, approx. 1 pages
Essay discusses how Scout and Jem are being watched in "To Kill a Mocking Bird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 88%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Coming of Age
394 words, approx. 1 pages
Essay discusses the issue of coming of age with Jem and Scout in "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 81%
To Kill a Mockingbird vs. Remember the Titans
390 words, approx. 1 pages
Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird and Jerry Bruckheimer's Remember the Titans: Opinion comparing Coach Boone and Atticus, why people originally thought they were not brave.
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Essay Grade: 83%
To Kill a Mockingbird: How Living Conditions Correlate to Character Personality
386 words, approx. 1 pages
An essay on Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. In the town of Maycomb, one's living environment reveals a lot about about the character of that individual or group. This essay examines how those living conditions relate to the character's personalities.
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Essay Grade: 83%
Jem
384 words, approx. 1 pages
Describes the interaction between Jem and Mrs. Dubose.
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Essay Grade: 82%
Father of the Year: Atticus Finch
381 words, approx. 1 pages
Atticus Finch evaluation of the parent
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Essay Grade: 92%
To Kill a Mockingbird: Setting Analysis
380 words, approx. 1 pages
Setting the story in the U.S. South was appropriate for Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird" because the South was where segregation and prejudice attitudes toward African-Americans was most prevalent.
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Essay Grade: 81%
Courage in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
378 words, approx. 1 pages
Atticus, Mrs. Dubose and Boo Radley were characters that all displayed tremendous courage in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird." Atticus willingly defended a black man; Mrs. Dubose tried to break her morphine addiction; and Boo Radley saved Scout and Jem from Bob Ewell.
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Essay Grade: 85%
Me as a Fictional Character
355 words, approx. 1 pages
I use this essay to compare myself to Atticus Finch, a main character in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 81%
Forshadowing, Conflict, Irony, and Symbolism of "to Kill a Mockingbird"
352 words, approx. 1 pages
This essay includes the forshawoding events, main conflicts, irony, and sybolism within the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird."

Essay by: Marie Burton

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Essay Grade: 89%
The Saving Servant
349 words, approx. 1 pages
The character Calpurnia in 'To Kill A Mockingbird' by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Character Description of Mrs Dubose
348 words, approx. 1 pages
Essay gives a character description of Mrs. Dubose from Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 87%
To Kill A Mockingbird - Boo Radley
337 words, approx. 1 pages
A 1 paragraph analysis of Boo Radley and the real person inside of him, despite what others think of him.  From the novel To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
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Essay Grade: 75%
Opinion on NAACP's Objections to "To Kill a Mockingbird"
332 words, approx. 1 pages
A review and opinion about the NAACP's objections to "To Kill a Mockingbird," the classic novel by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Conflicts between Blacks and Whites in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
331 words, approx. 1 pages
Essay discusses the conflits between the blacks and the whites of Maycomb County in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 81%
Alike in Affluence, Different in Dignity
331 words, approx. 1 pages
A comparison and contrast of the two poor boys, Walter Cunningham and Burris Ewell, from the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. Both boys grow up in the same environment, but while Walter is intelligent and behaves in a gentlemanly, prideful manner, Burris is ignorant, contentious, and vile.
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Essay Grade: 80%
The Bravery of Three Characters
328 words, approx. 1 pages
Essay discusses the bravery of three certain characters in "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 78%
Character is "To Kill a Mockingbird"
313 words, approx. 1 pages
Quick sketches of characters in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird." Some of the most important characters are Jem, Scout, Boo Radley and Atticus Finch.
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Essay Grade: 90%
Compassion in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
312 words, approx. 1 pages
Explains how compassion in "To Kill A Mockingbird" helps the characters triumph over hate.

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Essay Grade: 81%
Racism Revealed to Jem
310 words, approx. 1 pages
Essay discusses the aspect of racism in "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 78%
Contrast and Comparison of the Two Families
300 words, approx. 1 pages
Briefly discusses the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Considers the different values of families in different social classes.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mockingbird and Night, a Comparison
297 words, approx. 1 pages
Compares the Harper Lee novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, with the Elie Wiesel autobiographical tale, Night. Explores the common theme of racial prejudice.
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Essay Grade: 86%
Analysis of Jem in To Kill a Mockingbird
296 words, approx. 1 pages
Jem's character undergoes several changes in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. His transformation is briefly discussed, as are the ways in which he remains the same.
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Essay Grade: 75%
Humour in "to Kill a Mockingbird"
291 words, approx. 1 pages
In the novel "to kill a mocking bird", the main theme is racism, but amoung the serious prejudice and unfair judgements, their are small snippets of humour, in the form of sarcasim, ironicness, and child's perspectives.
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Essay Grade: 86%
To Kill a Mocking Bird
286 words, approx. 1 pages
Everything up in the novel To Kill A Mocking Bird the people of Maycomb county were prejudice. Scout and Jem learned that prejudice was wrong. Bob Ewell died because he was prejudice, but now I think that Maycomb, Alabama is now not as prejudice as in the beginning of the book.
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Essay Grade: 92%
True Courage
269 words, approx. 1 pages
This essay focuses on the theme of true courage in Harper Lee's book, "To Kill a Mockingbird." It highlights the characters of Atticus, Mrs. Dubose, and Calpurnia as well as their courageous acts.
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Essay Grade: 78%
To Kill a Mockingbird~Mockingbird Motif
269 words, approx. 1 pages
The essay describes what the mockingbird symbolizes in the book.
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Essay Grade: 80%
Was To Kill A Mockingbird About Prejudice?
261 words, approx. 1 pages
Discusses whether there is prejudice occuring in "To Kill a Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 78%
Scout, a Character Analysis
247 words, approx. 1 pages
Analyzes the character of Scout from the Harper Lee novel, To Kill a Mockingbird.
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Essay Grade: 87%
Social Divisions within Maycomb
243 words, approx. 1 pages
Short essay on the social divisions seen in Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird."
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Essay Grade: 87%
Summary of "To Kill A Mockingbird"
236 words, approx. 1 pages
Essay consists of a summary of the book "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 81%
Atticus Finch
235 words, approx. 1 pages
Describes the character Atticus Finch from Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. Reveals Finch as a man of wisdom and courage. Discusses his impact on other characters in the story.
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Essay Grade: 86%
The Major Change of Scout
234 words, approx. 1 pages
The changes of Scout Finch from "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 88%
Innocence in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
221 words, approx. 1 pages
Essay discusses the innocence of characters in "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.

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Essay Grade: 82%
Innocence in "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee
220 words, approx. 1 pages
Essay answers the questions of why the book is called "To Kill a Mockingbird", the significance of mockingbirds to the story, and what characters can be compared to mockingbirds.
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Essay Grade: 78%
To Kill A Mockingbird - Boo Radley's Character
207 words, approx. 1 pages
Boo Radley's character.
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Essay Grade: 79%
Jem's Responsibility and Feelings on Boo
204 words, approx. 1 pages
Discusses Jem's responsibility and his feelings on Boo.
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Essay Grade: 75%
About Charles Harris Baker (Dill)
147 words, approx. 1 pages
A brief look into Dill Harris' thoughts and his personality. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee.
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Essay Grade: 85%
Realizations of Scout in To Kill a Mockingbird.
144 words, approx. 1 pages
Different things Scout realizes throughout the book.
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Essay Grade: 86%
The Courage of Atticus
141 words, approx. 1 pages
Displays the courage of Atticus Finch
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Essay Grade: 75%
To Kill a Mockingbird, Movie vs Book
122 words, approx. 0 pages
This essay/short answers describes the difference between the movie and the book version of To Kill a Mockingbird.

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