Pride and Prejudice Essay | The Symbolism of Elizabeth and Lydia in "Pride and Prejudice"

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The Symbolism of Elizabeth and Lydia in "Pride and Prejudice"

Summary: In Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice," the characters Elizabeth and Lydia's stories represent the right and wrong things to look for when pursuing a marriage.
In Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, the five Bennet sisters clearly divide into two groups. Elizabeth is head of the well-behaved girls and her equivalent Lydia, represents the badly behaved. Lydia's misbehaviour is a significant catalyst for Elizabeth uniting with Mr. Darcy; however, it was through accident rather than design. Although Elizabeth expresses some concern about Lydia's future happiness after she elopes, these two sisters hardly communicate with each other during the story.

Both Lydia and Elizabeth are the favourites of the parent they most resemble in personality. While Elizabeth is least liked by Mrs. Bennet, Lydia is her favourite and therefore overindulged. Lydia Bennet is the youngest daughter and behaves very foolishly throughout the novel. Her only interests are bonnets, balls and flirting with the soldiers stationed in town and she causes Elizabeth great embarrassment, behaving immodestly at the...

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This section contains 1,137 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Symbolism of Elizabeth and Lydia in "Pride and Prejudice"
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