To Kill a Mockingbird Essay | Racism in "To Kill a Mockingbird" and "A Patch of Blue"

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of Racism in "To Kill a Mockingbird" and "A Patch of Blue".
This section contains 1,094 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
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Racism in "To Kill a Mockingbird" and "A Patch of Blue"

Summary: The narrators in two civil rights novels, "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee and "A Patch of Blue" by Elizabeth Kata are naive to the reality of racism. Also, the literary techniques used by both authors.
The novels "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee and "A Patch of Blue" by Elizabeth Kata were written during the civil rights movement in the 1960s when both blacks and whites were marching and protesting for greater equality for the Afro-Americans. The reader is shown scenes of prejudice and racism that seem quite unfamiliar to a modern audience and this highlights the injustice, which still existed in America at that time. To Kill a Mockingbird is told through the point of view of a six year old narrator named Scout who is unable to understand the concept of racism. Similarly APB, uses a naive blind woman who is unaware of the difference in a person's colour of skin and why they are judged on this alone.

Racism is explored in the novel when Selina, a blind woman finds...

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This section contains 1,094 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Racism in "To Kill a Mockingbird"  and "A Patch of Blue"
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