To Kill a Mockingbird Essay | Symbolism of Mockingbirds in "To Kill a Mockingbird"

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Symbolism of Mockingbirds in "To Kill a Mockingbird"

Summary: In "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, mockingbirds represent people who have done nothing wrong but who are harmed by society. Atticus Finch, Boo Radley and Tom Robinson represent mockingbirds because they are persecuted unjustly by a racist community.
In "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, mockingbirds are represented by people who are hurt by society though they have done nothing. The literal meaning is birds who don't do anything but sing to make people happy. To hurt such an innocent, helpful creature is in a way causing harm to yourself. In the novel, three of the main characters symbolize mockingbirds. Atticus Finch is insulted and disapproved of by society because he has made a choice to do what he thinks is right. Boo Radley is rumored about and blamed for things because he lives alone and does not conform to society. Tom Robinson is judged by his skin color and doesn't receive a fair trial when he is accused of rape. Neither Atticus, Boo, or Tom deserve of the punishment they receive.

Atticus Finch is a kind, honest gentleman...

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This section contains 748 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Symbolism of Mockingbirds in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
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