Death of a Salesman Essay | Willy Loman's Relationship with His Children in "Death of a Salesman"

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Willy Loman's Relationship with His Children in "Death of a Salesman"

Summary: In Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman," Willy Loman fails to reach his American dream, so he lives vicariously through his sons, Happy and Biff. This dysfunctional relationship ruins the Loman family.

Most parents will do anything for their children. They want to protect them and give them everything they didn't have growing up. But most parents know when to draw the line between wanting the best for your kids and living vicariously through them. Willy Loman on the other hand did not draw the line and he ruined the lives of his family.

In Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman," Willy Loman was a petty man; he had many dreams but not the character to make those dreams come true. Like many he wanted the American dream of family, wealth and security. Willy was a salesman but never became very successful; he was loyal to his company but never reaped any benefits. Since he was not able to achieve success himself he lived through Biff in hopes Biff would be...

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This section contains 828 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Willy Loman's Relationship with His Children in "Death of a Salesman"
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