Andrew Carnegie Essay | Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of Robber Barons or Philanthropists?.
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Robber Barons or Philanthropists?

Summary: Do millionaires of the late 1800s and early 1900s, such as Cornelius Vanderbilt, Andrew Carnegie, and John D. Rockefeller, truly fit the definition of "robber barons," or were they really philanthropists? In the cases of these three successful businessmen, the answer is that they were more philanthropists than robber barons.
Robber Barons or Philanthropists?

In the late 1800s and early 1900s the term "Robber barons" came about. A robber baron is a description for businessmen of the period who only cared about personal profit and often participated in unfair business practices. But were these millionaires, such as Cornelius Vanderbilt, Andrew Carnegie, and John D. Rockefeller really as ruthless as this definition implies or were they really philanthropists, people who try to help others through their fortunes.

Sometimes the wrong idea is portrayed when it comes to these men. In actuality they all came from rather humble beginnings. Just look at Andrew Carnegie, the son of a weaver, was born in Scotland in 1848 and at age 13 immigrated to Pennsylvania. Carnegie would later found Carnegie Steel Company and own several subsidiaries like Pittsburgh Locomotive and Car Works. He is also the founder of many institutions such as Carnegie Institute of...

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This section contains 502 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Robber Barons or Philanthropists?
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