Edith Wharton Essay | Edith Wharton's View of Society's Hold on Men

This student essay consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis of Edith Wharton's View of Society's Hold on Men.
This section contains 5,935 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Edith Wharton's View of Society's Hold on Men

Edith Wharton's View of Society's Hold on Men

Summary: Even though the characters in Edith Wharton's novels The Age of Innocence and Summer are dissatisfied with their orthodox lifestyle, they know the title of "outcast" is an even heavier burden to bear. In the novel The Age of Innocence, Old New York stifles the individual development of young Newland Archer.
As human beings there comes a point in our lives when we must decide our own destiny. Regardless of social pressures, ultimately the choice of one's fate is left in the hands of the individual. However, due to the exposure of complete compliance to social ethics by members of society, individuals often choose their pre-determined fate subconsciously. Although members of society may stray from the conventional out of boredom, in the end the shame of leaving their comfortable lifestyle no matter how trite it may seem is unbearable. Therefore, even though the characters in Edith Wharton's novels The Age of Innocence and Summer are dissatisfied with their orthodox lifestyle, they know the title of "outcast" is an even heavier burden to bear. In the novel The Age of Innocence, Old New York stifles the individual development of young Newland Archer. He must follow rules that dictate not only his style...

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This section contains 5,935 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Edith Wharton's View of Society's Hold on Men
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