The Grapes of Wrath Essay | Student Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of Human Society's Relationship with Nature in "The Grapes of Wrath".
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Human Society's Relationship with Nature in "The Grapes of Wrath"

Summary: John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" is critical of humankind's desire to take everything possible from nature instead of living in harmony with it. A key theme is that nature has a way of protecting itself against the intrusion by society.
In the story Grapes of Wrath, the themes John Steinbeck expresses is universal in nature and human society. Many of the problems that arise for the Joad family and the migrants of California stem from selfishness. Man and their egos push nature to the edge, trying get every cent out of the land. Steinbeck conveys that nature is bigger than man it self, there is nothing that it can't over come.

Throughout the story the Joads are pictured as one of the families that has to endure the atrocious famine of the Great Depression in the 1920's. The `20s were a time when big money ruled everything. The monopolies of the industrial revolution were being copied in every employment situation in North America, and greed spread throughout society. The environment and employees were taking most of the damage due to...

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This section contains 412 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Human Society's Relationship with Nature in "The Grapes of Wrath"
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