Lord of the Flies Essay | Use of Language in Lord of the Flies

This student essay consists of approximately 1 page of analysis of Use of Language in Lord of the Flies.
This section contains 254 words
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Use of Language in Lord of the Flies

Summary: A synopsis of how William Golding effectively used brief, choppy language in Chapter 12 of his novel Lord of the Flies to stimulate the reader's interest in the scene, in which the angry mob of boys tracks down Ralph.
In the novel Lord of the Flies by William Golding, language is effectively used to help stimulate interest in the scene in which Ralph is being hunted down by the angry mob of boys. The language in this scene is effectively used to help bring the reader into the story, so that he or she feels that they are involved in the action. A clear example of the language used can be found on page 196, "What was to be done, then? The tree? Burst the line like a boar? Either way the choice was terrible." This choppy and brief language helps to convey the frantic mood of this scene. This language helps the create interest for the reader because it helps the reader better understand the feelings of the characters in the scene. The author also utilizes descriptive language to help arouse interest in the "hunt" scene. Vivid language can be found on page 199 when Ralph is face to face with his possible assassin, "You could see a knee disturb the mold. Now the other. Two hands. A spear. A face." These short but yet very descriptive and vivid images help to pique the reader's interest in the situation at hand. Once again, this use of language is necessary in creating interest in the vicious hunt that is going on. Without the creative use of language contained within chapter 12, readers of Lord of the Flies would not have been as interested in the scene in which Ralph is ferociously hunted down.
This section contains 254 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
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