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Essay | The Initiation of Sarty into Manhood in "Barn Burning"

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of The Initiation of Sarty into Manhood in "Barn Burning".
This section contains 780 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
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The Initiation of Sarty into Manhood in "Barn Burning"

Summary: The central themes in William Faulkner's "Barn Burning" are initiation and morality. In the wake of his father Abner's penchant for burning barns, young Colonel Sartoris "Sarty" Snopes is confronted with the conflict between loyalty to his family and adherance to honor and justice. After Abner's death, and with no one to force Sarty to be loyal to his family instead of what is right, he chooses the side of freedom and justice and completes his initiation into manhood.
The central theme in William Faulkner's "Barn Burning" is initiation and morality. Young Colonel Sartoris "Sarty" Snopes is confronted with the conflict between loyalty to his family and to honor and justice.

Emphasis on family loyalty becomes apparent immediately at the opening of the story, when Sarty is already feeling the "old fierce pull of blood" (400). In front of a Justice of the Peace in a makeshift courtroom, Sarty is already aware that everyone in the court room is not only his father's enemy, but his own as well: ."..our enemy he thought in that despair; ourn! Mine and hisn both! He's my father!" (400) Sarty's father Abner is constantly reminding him of his responsibilities as part of a family and of the importance of family blood, apparent in his comment, "You got to learn to stick to your own blood or...

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This section contains 780 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Initiation of Sarty into Manhood in "Barn Burning"
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