Oedipus the King Essay | Seeing and Not Seeing in "Oedipus the King"

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of Seeing and Not Seeing in "Oedipus the King".
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Seeing and Not Seeing in "Oedipus the King"

Summary: A look at the motif of blindness in Sophocles' play "Oedipus the King." While Oedipus first appearing as an all-knowing, honorable king, his sight of mind diminishes throughout the story, and Oedipus does not regain full insight until he gouges out his own eyes, relinquishing the sense of sight. Only at that point can Oedipus see the piercing, revealing truth about his life and life in general.
Seeing and Not-Seeing in Oedipus

In the play Oedipus the King by Sophocles, Oedipus's sight of mind continues to diminish throughout the play. While he first appears on stage as the all-knowing, honorable king, this image begins to unravel as information about his past and the murder of Laius is revealed. Oedipus loses sight of his purpose, instead choosing to shun the aid of Teiresias the blind prophet and of the gods when he is presented with startling and confusing possibilities. It is not until the entire truth is revealed to him and he gouges out his own eyes with the gold pins of his wife and mother that Oedipus if able to regain full insight and appreciation of the bitter, cursed world.

Oedipus's meeting with the blind prophet Teiresias provides the audience with the first sign that Oedipus has lost sight...

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This section contains 857 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Seeing and Not Seeing in "Oedipus the King"
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