William Faulkner Essay | Racism in "Light and August"

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of Racism in "Light and August".
This section contains 1,075 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
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Racism in "Light and August"

Summary: The theme of racism in "Light in August" by William Faulkner shows the cruelty and unnecessariness of racism in the American South of the 1930s. Both whites and blacks in the novel are treated differently based upon their race or their perceive connections to their race.
Racism is defined as prejudice or discrimination against a person or group because of a difference of race. This is the major theme and conflict in William Faulkner's Light in August. The portrayal of racism communicates effectively Faulkner's ideas about the mistreatment of black people in the 1930's. He uses Joanna Burden, the society, and Joe Christmas to show that racism is an unnecessary and a brutal part of this world.

Miss Joanna Burden is an older woman with very few friends, that lives by herself outside Jefferson. The reason for this is that she is discriminated against for her beliefs, "They deal with their discomfort by labelling, denouncing, or ignoring her..."(Wittenberg 117) She believes that everyone is equal regardless of their race: " I had seen and known Negroes since I could remember. I just looked at them as I did at rain. After that...

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This section contains 1,075 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Racism in "Light and August"
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