The Canterbury Tales Essay | Student Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of The Marriage Debate in The Canterbury Tales.
This section contains 799 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
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The Marriage Debate in The Canterbury Tales

Summary: Four tales in Geoffrey Chaucer's work The Canterbury Tales serve as examinations of the concept of marriage and the problems that can arise from it. The marriages covered in three of the tales -- "The Clerk's Tale," "The Wife of Bath's Tale," and "The Merchant's Tale" -- fall victim to trials of loyalty, one-sidedness, and impatience. The fourth, "The Franklin's Tale," presents the resolution of problems with the least amount of heartache, leaving a marriage that is tested and true.
The Cost of Marriage

In Geoffrey Chaucer's work, The Canterbury Tales, many travelers gather together to begin a pilgrimage. During their quest, each of the pilgrims proceed to tell a tale to entertain the group. From these stories arise four different tales, in which Chaucer uses to examine the concept of marriage and the problems that arise from this bonding of two people. In the tales of "The Franklin", "The Clerk", "The Wife of Bath", and "The Merchant", marriage is debated and examined from different perspectives. Out of the four tales, The Franklin's Tale presents the most reasonable solution to the marriage debate because the problems are resolved with the least amount of heartache.

In "The Franklin's Tale", a young Breton Knight by the name of Arveragus marries a beautiful girl, Dorigen. Soon after their marriage, Arveragus is called to serve two years...

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This section contains 799 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Marriage Debate in The Canterbury Tales
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