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Essay | Lord of the Flies: Hell in Paradise

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of Lord of the Flies.
This section contains 522 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Lord of the Flies: Hell in Paradise

Lord of the Flies: Hell in Paradise

Summary: The first chapters of William Golding's celebrated novel Lord of the Flies reveal the evil elements in what at first glance appears to be an ideal paradise. In the first chapter, readers see first the scar, the first symbol of destruction of a once unspoiled place, and then they see the creepers that resemble the snake of Eden, the forest which resembles eternal darkness, and the witch-like-yell that represents the wailing and weeping from the underworld. The second chapter, in describing the boys' signal fire having gone out of control, provides the readers with a clear vision of hell.
HELL IN PARADISE

A wondrous lush tropical island is often regarded as a paradise. However, the biblical paradise contains some evil elements, such as the wicked snake. In the particular case of William Golding's breathtaking and acclaimed novel Lord of the Flies, this can be undoubtedly seen given that although the author presents an island which seems ideal and perfect the first chapters let the readers take in evil elements.

First of all, the opening chapter contains clear indicators of the presence of evil on the apparently ideal island. The first evil element that the island presents is the scar. Tough it is not exactly a symbol of evil; it clearly represents the sign of human destruction. An originally pristine place corrupted by the introduction of evil. Another apparent sign of evil on the island is the jungle itself. It is dark and...

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This section contains 522 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Lord of the Flies: Hell in Paradise
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