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Essay | Meyer Wolfsheim in "The Great Gatsby"

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of Meyer Wolfsheim in "The Great Gatsby".
This section contains 1,007 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Meyer Wolfsheim in "The Great Gatsby"

Meyer Wolfsheim in "The Great Gatsby"

Summary: In F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby," Meyer Wolfshiem is a minor character, but an important one. He stands as a symbol of all that was wrong with the corruption and greed of the 1920s and served as Jay Gatsby's father figure.
During the Roaring 20's corruption in American society skyrocketed. A distorted version of the American dream was coined, as the productivity and economic success increased. Americans pride themselves on their drive to attain whatsoever they please, namely wealth; and ultimately the "obsessive, unfulfillable desire within the pursuit becomes more important..." than living life. While Americans, both in the 1920's and even in 2005, devote a majority of their time to doing their jobs and making money, their reasons are not legitimate and often blind them from recognizing their adverse and immoral behavior. In The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Meyer Wolfsheim, although a minor character, has significant importance in the novel as he is both the zenith of greed and amorality, and is the creator of the famous Jay Gatsby. In other words, it is necessary to understand who Meyer Wolfsheim is in order...

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This section contains 1,007 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Meyer Wolfsheim in "The Great Gatsby"
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