The Necklace Essay | "The Necklace" and the Value of Possessions

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of "The Necklace" and the Value of Possessions.
This section contains 746 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on "The Necklace" and the Value of Possessions

"The Necklace" and the Value of Possessions

Summary: An analysis of the central character Mathilde Loisel in Guy de Maupassant's short story "The Necklace." In this story, de Maupassant ingeniously portrays Mathilde's continuous struggle with excessive wants that ultimately doom her to perpetual despair, showing that those who rely on materialistic items for happiness are typically desolated and miserable.
The Value of Possessions

The late Irish poet Oscar Wilde once stated, "In the world there are only two tragedies. One is not getting what one wants, and the other is getting it" (qtd. in The Quotations Page). This quote accurately describes human nature to the extent that man is never fully satisfied with his current possessions. In fact, most people who rely on materialistic items for happiness are typically desolated and miserable. Guy de Maupassant enlivens these assertions in his short story, "The Necklace." Maupassant reveals his ingenious style through a portrayal of a battle with morality, in which the central character, Mathilde Loisel, struggles with excessive wants that ultimately doom her to perpetual despair.

In the beginning of "The Necklace," the reader can clearly distinguish Madame Loisel's immense need for luxurious items. Maupassant describes Madame Loisel as somewhat miserable due to...

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This section contains 746 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on "The Necklace" and the Value of Possessions
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