The Awakening Essay | Symbolism in Kate Chopin's The Awakening

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of Symbolism in Kate Chopin's The Awakening.
This section contains 966 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
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Symbolism in Kate Chopin's The Awakening

Summary: An overview of some of the basic symbolism in Kate Chopin's novel The Awakening, with a uncommon interpretation. While smaller symbols abound, the concept of water and birds weaves itself throughout the novel, finally tying together at the end when Edna drowns.
In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, greater meanings lie beneath layers of symbolism. While it seems on the surface a largely feminist work, with the heroine finding happiness outside of traditional roles and then becoming a victim of society's inability to understand, this concept is challenged by the symbolism used throughout the novel. After examining the symbolism with great care, Chopin's mixed feelings on female independence are revealed. Metamorphosis, seen as water, may seem manageable while the weak bird (Edna) is surrounded by the protection of society, but in the end life swallows those unable to find their place. Other, smaller symbols abound, but the concept of water and birds weaves itself throughout, finally tying together at the end of the novel.

Water and swimming are first introduced early in the novel, when Edna returns from swimming with Robert on page three. However, it is...

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This section contains 966 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Symbolism in Kate Chopin's The Awakening
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