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Essay | The Good Side of The Monster Caliban in "The Tempest"

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of The Good Side of The Monster Caliban in "The Tempest".
This section contains 988 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Good Side of The Monster Caliban in "The Tempest"

The Good Side of The Monster Caliban in "The Tempest"

Summary: In William Shakespeare's "The Tempest," there is more to the monster Caliban than first appears. Although he can be a brutal monster, as demonstrated by his orders to kill Prospero, he has a good, peaceful side to his personality.
Caliban, `a savage and deformed slave' in the words of Shakespeare, is known to be a monster in the play. He is more likely Prospero's (duke of Milan, stuck on an island) servant "that Caliban whom now I keep in service." He is son of the witch Sycorax who is dead now. The island belonged to her until Prospero came and took over, using the power of his magic. However, Caliban claims the island belongs to him and that he became from king to servant "this islands mine, by Sycorax my mother, which thou tak`st from me." In the whole play, Caliban is referred to as a monster "monsieur monster." The definition of monster is "A creature having a strange or frightening appearance." Every monster has a frightening appearance, other wise it would not be called a `monster'. Everyone...

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This section contains 988 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Good Side of The Monster Caliban in "The Tempest"
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