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Essay | Popularity of The Catcher in the Rye Explained

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of Popularity of The Catcher in the Rye Explained.
This section contains 864 words
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Popularity of The Catcher in the Rye Explained

Summary: J.D. Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye retains unanimous popularity across North America, not only for its intrinsic themes, motifs, and images, but also for its undeterred portrayal of life itself. The likability of the main character Holden Caulfield, the novel's universal themes and symbolism, and the novel's underlying social commentary all make The Catcher in the Rye much more than simply a tale of growing up.
The Catcher in the Rye is the second most taught book in American high schools. The reason for this novel's popularity is greater than the value of studying Salinger's well-crafted prose and the novel's universal themes. On the surface The Catcher in the Rye is a story about the events that took place on three December days after a seventeen-year-old boy, Holden Caulfield, has been expelled from his school, Pencey Prep. We are let in on his most intimate thoughts and are exposed to his non-conformist view of the world, which is intriguing, as he has been placed into a "rest home" for having a nervous breakdown. However, The Catcher in the Rye is not simply a tale of growing up, of losing one's innocence, or of non-conformity, but instead is a study of how one perceives and understands oneself as part...

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This section contains 864 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Popularity of The Catcher in the Rye Explained
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