The Crucible Essay | Portrayal of Religion and Sin in "The Crucible"

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Portrayal of Religion and Sin in "The Crucible"

Summary: Arthur Miller uses dramatic irony in his play "The Crucible" through the portrayal of religion and sin, resulting in the play's characters and the audience deriving different meanings from the words and actions of the play. The characters in the play whom the residents of Salem perceive to be righteous and virtuous are actually depicted to the audience as sinners, while the ones accused of witchcraft by the residents are seen by the audience as being the most pious.
In Arthur Miller's play, The Crucible, his portrayal of religion and sin create dramatic irony. In the story, the words and actions of the characters take on a different meaning for the audience than they have for the characters in the play. The people who are supposedly righteous and good are portrayed as sinners, and the people who are looked upon as witches are really the most pious ones.

The most sinful characters are those who are on the side of the court such as Reverend Parris, Judge Danforth, Abigail and the girls, the Putnams, and Judge Hathorne. Reverend Parris is a person who is viewed as the most righteous because he is the minister of Salem's church, but in fact, he is a sinner, because he is a power-hungry man who wants nothing but to be respected in the town. Whenever...

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This section contains 1,080 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Portrayal of Religion and Sin in "The Crucible"
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