Of Mice and Men Essay | Crooks' Transformation in John Steninbeck's Of Mice and Men

This student essay consists of approximately 6 pages of analysis of Crooks' Transformation in John Steninbeck's Of Mice and Men.
This section contains 1,721 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
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Crooks' Transformation in John Steninbeck's Of Mice and Men

Summary: Crooks, a seeming minor character in John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, undergoes a circular transformation in the novel. He goes from hopeless resignation, to loneliness, to hopefulness in partaking of George and Lennie's dream of living "offa the fatta of the lan'," to finally becoming the victim again and returning to his life of painful loneliness.
Chapter Four of John Steinbeck's emotionally moving, but bleak, novel, Of Mice and Men, is devoted to the character of Crooks. The chapter begins and ends with this recluse character applying liniment, a medicinal fluid rubbed into the skin to soothe pain or relieve stiffness, to his "crooked" back. One of the first impressions given to readers is of his physical pain- which presumable parallels his emotional, or spiritual pain. More to the point, however, the first five words of the chapter, "Crooks, the negro stable buck.." (66), characterize the key element driving this characters particular shade of lonliness. For in contrast to the lonliness of Candy or of Curly's wife, Crooks is devided from the world by his race. So, on one level, with the character of Crooks, Steinbeck captures social injustice of the times, and, on another level, offers yet...

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This section contains 1,721 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Crooks' Transformation in John Steninbeck's Of Mice and Men
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