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Essay | "Havisham" Response

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of "Havisham" Response.
This section contains 510 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on "Havisham" Response

"Havisham" Response

Summary: A comparative, analytical examination of Duffy's "Havisham" and the "Havisham Sequence" in Dickens' Great Expectations, including the interesting ways in which Duffy used the Havisham story in her poem.
Upon reading the prose and poems, I gain the impression that Miss Havisham is certainly a strange, old woman. Whilst in the novel I pity her, she seems a broken woman. But in the poem, I view her as a malevolent and decrepit creature. Duffy's use of the oxymoron, "Beloved sweetheart bastard" is shocking but also presents a distraught woman, shattered by grief.

The character of Miss Havisham was denied `true love' when she was jilted at the alter. I think Dickens captures the crippling effects of disappointment, but it is Duffy who adds currents and undertones of anger, despair and frustration, effectively and powerfully.

I really enjoyed the imagery that Duffy uses and how it links with Dickens' descriptive text. Dickens makes Miss Havisham sound tired and worn, " Now, waxwork and skeleton seemed to have dark eyes", whilst in the poem Duffy presents Miss Havisham as less...

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This section contains 510 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on "Havisham" Response
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