The Return of the Native Essay | Student Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 1 page of analysis of Eustacia in Return of the Native -- Me, Myself, and I.
This section contains 209 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)

Eustacia in Return of the Native -- Me, Myself, and I

Summary: An overview of Eustacia's actions in Thomas Hardy's novel Return of the Native. These actions illustrate the dramatic, self-centered nature of Eustacia's personality and her ignorance of other people's feelings.
"Love was to her the one cordial which could drive away the eating loneliness of her days. And she seemed to long for the abstraction called passionate love more than for any particular lover." (Hardy, 70)

In Thomas Hardy's Return of the Native, Eustacia is a very dramatic, selfish individual. She thinks herself better than everyone else, and seems to expect attention from others. In the book, she often makes a big deal of the smallest problems and makes impulsive decisions.

In her relationship with Wildeve she treats him badly until she begins to feel threatened by his relationship with Thomasin. She knows that he will always lover her but she wants Wildeve to be devoted to her and her only.

When she hears that Clym has been living in Paris she becomes attracted to him merely because of her hatred of the heath. Forgetting Wildeve, she pursues Clym and when they marry she presses him to return to Paris. Being unable to convince him to leave, she becomes depressed and isolates herself.

Completely ignoring that she is loved by both Clym and Wildeve, she throws herself into a pool on the heath, ending her life. Her decision to kill herself is only more proof of her self-centeredness and ignorance of others' feelings.

This section contains 209 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
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