The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Essay | Student Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 1 page of analysis of Conclusion of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
This section contains 215 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)

Conclusion of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Summary: A short analysis of Huck Finn at the end of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, with particular regard to how Huck's life and personality tie closely to the Mississippi River.
The novel ends with Huck continuing down the Mississippi River to wherever it takes him. Huck has come a long way by himself, and I think that this suits him most. Huck is a quiet individual with himself in mind. As Huck throughout the whole story conquers many challenges, it all relates to one thing, the Mississippi River.

Huck's true, inner emotions come about on that quite, long river. This is where Huck can find refuge from the ever so changing world. Huck is your typical American, looking onward to see what life has next in store in this beautiful world. As he later comes across and sees how true America is like, Huck does not like it and continues down on the river. Huck is a true self individual and does not want to be involved in this time period's issues and matters.

The Mississippi throws natural challenges at Huck, yet also is a relaxation place for him. Where ever the river takes Huck, is where he wants to go, which is anywhere. Huck is too wild to be told what to do. Huck sleeps, eats, stops anything whenever he wants, and society will "sivilize" him if he lets it. Twain is letting Huck free now, and its for the best, both himself and America.

This section contains 215 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
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