To His Coy Mistress Essay | Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of Human Mortality in "To His Coy Mistress" and "The Bull Moose".
This section contains 695 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Human Mortality in "To His Coy Mistress" and "The Bull Moose"

Human Mortality in "To His Coy Mistress" and "The Bull Moose"

Summary: The poems "To His Coy Mistress" by Andrew Marvell and "The Bull Moose" by Alden Nowland both meditate on the meaning of death. While Marvell romanticizes death, Nowland takes a realistic approach.
Despite the way that either Romanticism or metaphysics approaches the connection between spiritual world and human reality, there are still some alternative ways in expressing the relationship between human mortality and death. The poems "To His Coy Mistress" and "The Bull Moose" both stress death as well as the impact of death. Nevertheless, both of the two poems emphasize death and how human beings respond to death. By applying different writing approaches to romance the themes, these poems reveal very different aspects of human mortality and our attitude toward death.

In "To His Coy Mistress," Marvell presents the relationship between death and human mortality in a more romantic mode: "My vegetable should grow." The metaphor "vegetable" represents the life - long love with healthy essence that the speaker wants to hold. Also, in "To His Coy Mistress", the speaker's mind changes from line to line to express his...

(read more)

This section contains 695 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Human Mortality in "To His Coy Mistress" and "The Bull Moose"
Copyrights
BookRags
Human Mortality in "To His Coy Mistress" and "The Bull Moose" from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook