The Crucible Essay | Madness: the Devil's Agent in Salem

This student essay consists of approximately 6 pages of analysis of Madness.
This section contains 1,676 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
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Madness: the Devil's Agent in Salem

Summary: Madness on the part of several key characters in Arthur Miller's play "The Crucible" led to the destructive witch trials. The paranoia of Reverend Parris, the sociopathy of Thomas Putnam, and the psychopathy of Abigail Williams all were untreatable mental illnesses during the time depicted in "The Crucible." Such disorders contributed greatly to the havoc that the witch trials brought, and they also make one thankful for our current knowledge and treatment of mental illnesses.
Madness: The Devil's Agent in Salem

by Colin Swanson

Euripides, the renowned ancient Greek playwright, put forth the thought, "the devil when he purports any evil against man, first perverts his mind." If we take Euripides' idea and apply it to the infamous witch trials of The Crucible, then yes, the devil was at work in Salem, but not in the form of black magic. His agents were alive and well in the form of madness among certain members of the townsfolk. Mental illness has forever plagued mankind, but until relatively recently, illness of the mind was not even understood as a concept by the general public. It was not until before the beginning of the last century that mental illness was recognized and began to be diagnosed. Today, psychologists know of hundreds of different mental disorders with highly specific symptoms and characteristics. In...

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This section contains 1,676 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Madness: the Devil's Agent in Salem
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