As I Lay Dying Essay | Student Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of The Symbolism of Moseley in "As I Lay Dying".
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The Symbolism of Moseley in "As I Lay Dying"

Summary: The character of Moseley, the pharmacist, in William Faulkner's "As I Lay Dying" represents the ideal view of society, a stark contrast to the self-seeking behaviors of the Bundrens.
In William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, Moseley provides the reader an escape from the delusional world of the Bundrens and a glimpse of society, as it should be. Appearing only once in the novel, the elderly pharmacist is essential in emphasizing Faulkner's theme of moral values over self-seeking voracity in that he defends what he knows is right at all costs. Moseley is introduced in the small town of Mottson, where Dewey Dell wanders into his drugstore store with ten dollars from Lafe, and the intention of eliminating "the female trouble." (200) After much confusion, it is made clear that Dewey Dell wants an abortion, treatment that Moseley repeatedly refuses, despite her persistency. Discouraged, Dewey Dell eventually leaves, after a stern lecture from Moseley and advice to take the money and buy a marriage license. Moseley's morals, contrasting to the other...

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This section contains 727 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Symbolism of Moseley in "As I Lay Dying"
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