Candide Essay | A Philosophy about Life Events in "Candide"

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A Philosophy about Life Events in "Candide"

Summary: Voltaire's "Candide" was a satire of French society's beliefs about life, war and culture. The character of Dr. Pangloss puts forth a philosophy that we are living in "the best of all possible worlds." However, this can never be, Voltaire reveals, because of many uncontrollable factors such as conincidence and freedom of choice.
"Candide" also known as "Optimism" by Voltaire, was written in 1759 as a satirical novel to mock the current society's beliefs about life, war, and culture. Candide, the naive illegitimate son of a Baroness, was raised in the company of the unrealistic philosopher, Dr. Pangloss in the castle of his mother's brother, the Baron. Pangloss teaches Candide many impractical theories about life. One of many ideas Pangloss theorizes with Candide about is the concept of "The best of all possible worlds," an idea which Candide preserves in his mind (optimism) throughout his horrid adventures. The speculation that we live in the best of all possible worlds is highly impracticable for many reasons such as, coincidental instances, and freedom of choice.

The main quote from Pangloss' speculations in which the story's foundation is set upon, " It is demonstrable... that things cannot be otherwise than they...

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This section contains 530 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on A Philosophy about Life Events in "Candide"
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