Idylls of the King Essay | Student Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis of "The Holy Grail" in Tennyson's The Idylls of the King.
This section contains 1,498 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on "The Holy Grail" in Tennyson's The Idylls of the King: A Guidebook to Salvation

"The Holy Grail" in Tennyson's The Idylls of the King: A Guidebook to Salvation

Summary: An allegorical analysis of "The Holy Grail," a chapter and story in Alfred Lord Tennyson's work The Idylls of the King. In this chapter, Tennyson discusses themes of salvation, righteous behavior, temptation, and overzealousness with the help of allegory. This allegorical approach served as a guide to eventual salvation for both the characters of the story and the astute reader.
J.R.R. Tolkien, the author of The Lord of the Rings trilogy, once said, "I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations, and always have done since I grew old and wary enough to detect its presence," when he was asked if The Lord of the Rings was an allegory. Mr. Tolkien felt allegory was a waste of time and a nuisance, but Alfred Lord Tennyson, the author of The Idylls of the King, would have had a very different opinion on allegory. Tennyson used allegory to great effect in all his Idylls, including "The Holy Grail." "The Holy Grail" is, literally, the tale of Sir Percivale's quest to find the Holy Grail, but it has a much deeper allegorical meaning. Allegory is officially defined by Webster's dictionary as the expression by means of symbolic...

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This section contains 1,498 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on "The Holy Grail" in Tennyson's The Idylls of the King: A Guidebook to Salvation
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