Watership Down Essay | Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of The Settings in Watership Down by Richard Adams.
This section contains 305 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)

The Settings in Watership Down by Richard Adams

Summary: A look at four different settings in Richard Adams' novel Watership Down and how each setting affected the characters. Although the settings were dangerous places, the characters used them to the best of their abilities in their journey to a safer place.
There were many different settings in Watership Down. These settings each played a significant role in the rabbit's lives, with its advantages and disadvantages. The rabbits used these settings to the best of their abilities, and prevailed in their journey to a safer place.

In the beginning of the book, the setting was of a large sized warren, located near a soon to be construction site. Fiver was the only one to sense the great danger lurking around the warren, and him and Hazel gathered believers to follow their path in search of a safer place. Another setting was the Farm, near Watership Down. Hazel got some of his rabbits away from a cat located at the farm and used this farm to retrieve two does. He also set the dog free to free his warren from the Efrafan attacks underway. In doing so, he got injured from a cat, and was saved by a little girl who lived there. A different setting was Efrafa. This was a terrible warren located near their warren. This setting took part in their scheme to retrieve does. Bigwig joined this warren as a patrol officer, and escaped with many does and Blackavar, a beaten refugee. The does and Blackavar became respected members of Hazel's warren. One more setting was the great river, and the boat. This river and boat played a great role in their escape with the does and Blackavar. They escaped from General Woundwort, the fiercest rabbit known to rabbit-kind, by using this boat to float down the river. This completely baffled General Woundwort and made him look like the biggest fool.

Each of these settings took part in the rabbit's lives for a good reason, even though they seemed to be the most dangerous places. Without these advantages, Hazel's warren wouldn't exist today.

This section contains 305 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
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