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Essay | The Evolution of Tragedy

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of The Evolution of Tragedy.
This section contains 1,183 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
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The Evolution of Tragedy

Summary: A comparison study of Sophocles' Oedipus the King and Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman" show the evolution of the tragic hero from the time of the Greek playwrights to the present day. The Greek concept of the tragic hero involves a person in a position of great power or influence, whose fall from that position occurs through a series of events completely beyond his control. In the modern-day concept, the tragic hero has never achieved power or influence, and while the tragic hero can control the events that cause the inevitable fall, he or she lacks the wisdom to do so.
The elements of tragedy include catharsis, hamartia, hubris, peripeteia and anagnorisis.

Catharsis is the emotional discharge that brings a moral renewal that purges emotions such as fear and pity. In Oedipus the king, this occurs when the final link shows that he is indeed Jocasta's son. He finds that out after realising where he killed a group of people is the place where Laius died. He also finds out that the shepherd saw his mother place him on the hills and that his mother was Jocasta. All the tension and mystery is gone and is replaced by grief and woe by the horrific act he has commited. The climax is when he sees his dead wife and finally decides to rid himself of sight by blinding himself.

For Willy Loman, it occurs when he finally kills himself. He discharged his emotion of helplessness by killing himself...

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This section contains 1,183 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Evolution of Tragedy
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