Cry, the Beloved Country Essay | South African Tribal Decay in Alan Paton's Cry the Beloved

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of South African Tribal Decay in Alan Paton's Cry the Beloved.
This section contains 834 words
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South African Tribal Decay in Alan Paton's Cry the Beloved

Summary: Essay about the decay of the South African tribal system that took place in the 1940's. Essay focuses on the book Cry, the Beloved Country, written by Alan Paton.
In Alan Paton's Cry, The Beloved Country, the village of Ndotsheni faces great destruction after the land becomes barren from drought, overuse and disrespect. The decay of the village and South African tribal system becomes apparent when most of the young adults leave the village and travel to Johannesburg to make their living. Stephen Kumalo, the town's Zulu priest, and his family become victims of the town's deterioration. "My own son, my own sister, my own brother. They go away and they do not write anymore. Perhaps it does not seem to them that we suffer. Perhaps they do not care for it," Stephen Kumalo says of the three estranged members of his family (II 39). First, Stephen's son, Absalom, leaves his home to make a more prosperous living in Johannesburg, but is quickly led astray; secondly, Stephen's sister, Gertrude, leaves...

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This section contains 834 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on South African Tribal Decay in Alan Paton's Cry the Beloved
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