Forgot your password?  

Essay | A Murderous Comparison: Blind Obedience in "Lord of the Flies" and "The Lottery"

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of A Murderous Comparison.
This section contains 702 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on A Murderous Comparison: Blind Obedience in "Lord of the Flies" and "The Lottery"

A Murderous Comparison: Blind Obedience in "Lord of the Flies" and "The Lottery"

Summary: The plots of classic works "Lord of the Flies" by William Golding and "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson are fictional examples of how misguided authority and blind obedience to tradition can create societies filled with inhumane cruelties. In both stories, a mob mentality enables a society's leaders to do anything, even commit murder.
In "Lord of the Flies" by William Golding and "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson, callous authority and blind obedience to that authority combine to create a brutal society. In William Golding's Lord of the Flies, an older boy, Jack, leads the way to murder by a group of marooned children. Similarly, in Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery," Mr. Summers rallies the townspeople to random killing based on tradition. In both cases, the leaders create a mob mentality, in which drowning out all who disagree is the name of the game. Death and devastation result in both microcosms of our world.

Authority is the spark that starts out small but later incites group murder. In both stories, the leaders seize power and control of an insecure population. In Lord of the Flies, Jack and his henchman (for example, Maurice...

(read more)

This section contains 702 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on A Murderous Comparison: Blind Obedience in "Lord of the Flies" and "The Lottery"
Follow Us on Facebook