The House of the Seven Gables Essay | Weather Metapors in House of the Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of Weather Metapors in House of the Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne.
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Weather Metapors in House of the Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne

Summary: Nathaniel Hawthorne's usage of weather metaphors cleverly conveys the image of the many facets of the characters' individuality and demeanor throughout the novel. Phoebe's innocence and purity, the volatile and shaky state of Clifford, and the appearance as well as the personality of Hepzibah are effectively represented in this story. These characters are faced with many trials and tribulations, and their strong qualities as well as their flaws assist them to prevail in the end.
The House of the Seven Gables, written by Nathaniel Hawthorne is a tale of greed and betrayal and the eventual resolution in which good triumphs over evil. In this 1851 Gothic Romance, the last of the Pyncheon line, Hepzibah, a misfortunate old maid, and her brother, Clifford, crazy from being in prison for a crime he never committed, are helped by a sweet country cousin and a mysterious boarder to overcome a centuries-old curse brought upon them by their ancestors. Interwoven throughout this story are many references to the characters' personalities and appearances and how they relate to weather. The use of these weather metaphors help further describe the kindness and purity of Phoebe, the chaotic state of Clifford's mind, and the appearance as well as the personality of Hepzibah.

The metaphors used to describe our young country cousin, Phoebe...

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This section contains 811 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Weather Metapors in House of the Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne
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