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Essay | Irony in World War II as Discussed by Paul Fussell

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of Irony in World War II as Discussed by Paul Fussell.
This section contains 683 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Irony in World War II as Discussed by Paul Fussell

Irony in World War II as Discussed by Paul Fussell

Summary: This is based on Paul Fussell's claim that the best way to interpret the Great War is by the use of Irony in the writing. The written account of a specific battle amidst an ongoing war, gives the people who are away from the front a glimpse into the soldier's life. Vera Brittain's account as a nurse, gives a nurse's perspective, and also the details about the injuries, and the magnitude of the destruction a war causes physically, as well as mentally. Irony, therefore, is the best way to depict all the horrifying details of the war, and also to make people understand that the war does not give, it takes, and it wins.
The Importance of the Irony in the Interpretation of the Great War:

The World War I was the first war fought after the industrial revolution that took place in Europe. The countries that were involved in this war were overly presumptuous that this war would be quick and efficient, because of the new weaponry that was the byproduct of the industrial revolution. But the soldiers realized that they were wrong about it. They thought the war would be over "before the Christmas" of year 1914. But they were wrong, and therefore found it necessary to disillusion the people back at home. Several war writers emerged who made the use of irony to expose the the brutality of the war. In short, they told it like it was - the ultimate truth about the war. Paul Fussell's theory states in his article...

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This section contains 683 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Irony in World War II as Discussed by Paul Fussell
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