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Essay | The Crucible: Insanity or Dementia?

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of The Crucible.
This section contains 576 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Crucible: Insanity or Dementia?

The Crucible: Insanity or Dementia?

Summary: Readers often explain Abigail Williams's behavior in Arthur Miller's "The Crucible" as cold-hearted evil. But Miller gives hints that her behavior may have been triggered by dementia.
As the town of Salem, Massachusetts cried witchcraft, one girl led the children's crusade against the accused. Succumbing to fits of hysteria and screaming names, the character of Abigail Williams is often portrayed as nothing short of a cold-hearted murderer with a certain talent for manipulating the prejudices of the people to get what she wants. Yet there may be another reality behind her actions, one that doesn't quite reveal her as the villain she is made out to be. This theory is one of insanity: that Abigail was not, in fact, completely in control. Not only this, but that she also may have really seen hallucinations, really believed that witches were attacking her and causing her bodily harm in her sleep. Arthur Miller's The Crucible has evidence to support both explanations for Abigail's behavior: the former of careful calculation, and the latter of dementia...

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This section contains 576 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Crucible: Insanity or Dementia?
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