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Essay | Dramatic Convention Analysis for Romeo and Juliet

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of Dramatic Convention Analysis for Romeo and Juliet.
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Dramatic Convention Analysis for Romeo and Juliet

Summary: Juliet's Act II soliloquy in William Shakespeare's play "Romeo and Juliet" ("O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?") provides the play's turning point, using both light and dark imagery. Had not Romeo eavesdropped on Juliet during this soliloquy, they may never have become star-crossed lovers. As a result of the soliloquy and the eavesdropping, the two young lovers fall in love with each other, make their plans for the future, and begin their trek that is destined to end tragically.
Romeo and Juliet

Dramatic Conventions-

"O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo"

Deny thy father and refuse thy name;

Or if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,

And I'll no longer be a Capulet."

(2.1.76-79)

Usually in a play, there are dramatic conventions to convey to the audiences things that cannot be done in regular dialogue. In Act II, Romeo overhears Juliet speaking about him. This is soliloquy and monologue as well as aside. The reasons for this passage containing these dramatic conventions are because Juliet did not intend for Romeo to hear these lines. Romeo eavesdropped on Juliet, which created a huge turn in the play. Juliet's random love thoughts brought them together that night. If Romeo had not heard the words "O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo"" (Shakespeare 2.1.76), they might not have become the "star-crossed lovers" they were...

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This section contains 544 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Dramatic Convention Analysis for Romeo and Juliet
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