Sonnet 29 Essay | Student Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of Analysis of the Sonnet, "My Mistress' Eyes are Nothing like the Sun".
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Analysis of the Sonnet, "My Mistress' Eyes are Nothing like the Sun"

Summary: William Shakespeare turns romanticism on its ear with his Sonnet 130, "My Mistress' Eyes are Nothing like the Sun." Instead of extolling the beauty of the woman like most romantic poetry, he portays it realistically, instead focusing on the woman's personality as the reason she is wonderful.
At the time of its writing, Shakespeare's one hundred thirtieth sonnet, a highly candid, simple work, introduced a new era of poems. Shakespeare's expression of love was far different from traditional sonnets in the early 1600s, in which poets highly praised their loved ones with sweet words. Instead, Shakespeare satirizes the tradition of comparing one's beloved to the beauties of the sun. From its opening phrase "My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun", shocks the audience because it does not portray a soft, beautiful woman. Despite the negative connotations of his mistress, Shakespeare speaks a true woman and true love. The sonnet is a "how-to" guide to love.

This poem speaks of a love that is truer than denoting a woman's physical perfection or her "angelic voice." As those traits are all ones that will fade with...

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This section contains 586 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Analysis of the Sonnet, "My Mistress' Eyes are Nothing like the Sun"
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