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Essay | Analysis of Lady Macbeth's "Unsex Me Here" Soliloquy in "Macbeth"

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of Analysis of Lady Macbeth's "Unsex Me Here" Soliloquy in "Macbeth".
This section contains 1,099 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Analysis of Lady Macbeth's "Unsex Me Here" Soliloquy in "Macbeth"

Analysis of Lady Macbeth's "Unsex Me Here" Soliloquy in "Macbeth"

Summary: In William Shakespeare's "Macbeth," Lady Macbeth's famous "unsex me here" soliloquy shows her admirable yet appalling ambition. Lady Macbeth is the strength behind Macbeth and her ambition will be strong enough to drive her husband forward to his destiny.
The theme of ambition vs. humility is ever present in Shakespeare's' Macbeth. Many argue that it is Macbeth's ambition that categorizes him as a `tragic hero'. This passage, which appears in Act I, scene v, lines 36-52, occurs as Lady Macbeth awaits Macbeth's and King Duncan's arrival. Lady Macbeth has just recently learnt of the prophecies given to Macbeth, via letter, and already believes that Macbeth will not be able to do what is necessary to achieve greatness. Prior to this passage, Lady Macbeth contemplates Macbeth character and comments, "Thou wouldst be great; / Art not without ambition, but without/ The illness should attend it." (1.5.18-20) Her ambition is far greater than Macbeth, and therefore Lady Macbeth concludes "That I may pour my spirits in thine ear; / And chastise with the valour of my tongue" (1.5.26-27) This passage reflects many other...

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This section contains 1,099 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Analysis of Lady Macbeth's "Unsex Me Here" Soliloquy in "Macbeth"
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