Macbeth Essay | Student Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of Macbeth's Crippling Losses.
This section contains 912 words
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Macbeth's Crippling Losses

Summary: In Willam Shakespeare's "Macbeth," Macbeth's life is a tragedy because of the losses he experiences. Macbeth loses his soul (the "eternal jewel") in his mocking of the murderers' prayers. Macbeth also loses his reputation and manhood through his actions.
William Shakespeare Macbeth is the tragic portrayal of a man who's "good and virtuous nature... recoils in an imperial charge."[Macbeth, Act 4, scene 3, line18] Protagonist Macbeth encounters extreme losses throughout the entire play; his losses occur prior to the "unnatural deed", during, and after committing the "most sacrilegious murder."

Macbeth loses his "eternal jewel", or in other words his soul. His soul is merely the most momentous component of the "seasons of all nature." He goes through a quick, short expedition, beginning with his realization that his decision to "surcease," King Duncan will cause himself to "jump the life to come" [1, VII, 7], entailing that he would rather be King than go to the afterlife. Allowing him to notice his soul slowly diminishing when he can no longer turn to God to give his blessing for the mere reason that "amen stuck in {his} throat," disturbing him deeply...

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This section contains 912 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Macbeth's Crippling Losses
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