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Essay | Societal Resistance and Control in "The Handmaid's Tale"

This student essay consists of approximately 7 pages of analysis of Societal Resistance and Control in "The Handmaid's Tale".
This section contains 1,807 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Societal Resistance and Control in "The Handmaid's Tale"

Societal Resistance and Control in "The Handmaid's Tale"

Summary: Reistance and control are key themes in Margaret Atwood's feminist novel, "The Handmaid's Tale." The society of Gilead is a dystopia where recreation, sex and family life are all oppressively controlled.
The words control and Gilead, the setting for the novel "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood, are interchangeable. Not only is control a pivotal feature of the novel and its plot, it consequently creates the subplots, the characters and the whole world because of its enormity in the Republic of Gilead. Resistance also features heavily, as does its results, mainly represented in the salvagings, particicution and the threat of the colonies.

Control dominates all aspects of Gileadian society, from minor, seemingly petty normalities such as the clothes allowed, all the way up to how and who to have sexual relations with. Unimaginable in this day, Atwood represents modern society gone sour, something which is chillingly close enough to reality to get worried about.

As just mentioned, Uniform is a necessity of Gileadian society, for all layers of the hierarchy, even the top...

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This section contains 1,807 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Societal Resistance and Control in "The Handmaid's Tale"
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