Reality and Allusion in Sylvia Plath's "Lady Lazarus" Essay | Student Essay

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Reality and Allusion in Sylvia Plath's "Lady Lazarus"

Summary: Sylvia Plath's poem "Lady Lazarus," written just days before Plath's suicide in 1963, conveys a message about her own life, obsessions, weaknesses, and feelings. In chronicling her previous suicide attempts, Plath creatively uses biblical allusion to connect her Lady Lazarus to the book of John's Lazarus of Bethany; as Lazarus was resurrected from death, so Plath, or Lady Lazarus, is "reincarnated" after each suicide attempt. The poem thus serves as an allegory that retains a morbid sensation through its account of Plath's psychological journey.
Reality and Allusion in Sylvia Plath's Lady Lazarus

Sylvia Plath completed her masterpiece, Lady Lazarus, in the days prior to her suicide in 1963, while in a state of disturbance, distress, and obsession. To Plath, this was not just a poem; rather a message to others about her life, her enemies, and her struggles with everything from her family to mental stability. Lady Lazarus conveys Plath's real life suicide attempts, parallels to her classic novel, The Bell Jar, as well as a biblical allusion in its title, resulting in a horrific, yet detailed annotation of her psychological troubles.

Within the first three lines of her autobiographical poem, Plath endows the reader with a strong image and message, by simply stating she has attempted suicide three times. Plath proclaims, "I have done it again. / One year in every ten / I manage it...

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This section contains 1,443 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Reality and Allusion in Sylvia Plath's "Lady Lazarus"
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