The Picture of Dorian Gray Essay | The Pessimistic View of Victorian Life in "Dorian Gray"

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The Pessimistic View of Victorian Life in "Dorian Gray"

Summary: The upper class in the Victorian Era is depicted as decadant, shallow and unhappy in the novel "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde. The title character lives a lavish life that consists of secrets and burdens including his murder of Basil Hallward, his situation with the painting, and his eventual opium addiction.
The Picture of Dorian Gray, written by Oscar Wilde, describes the lives of numerous upper class citizens of Victorian England through incorporating highly detailed accounts of their beliefs and actions into the text. Such members of the upper class include the title character Dorian Gray, Lord Henry, Lady Narborough, and Gladys the Duchess of Monmouth, all of who fully explain the upper classes standing in the Victorian society. Through his use of countless aphorisms, Lord Henry proves to be the glue that keeps the remaining members of the upper class held together and the voice of Wilde within the text. The members of the upper class appear to live lavishly on the surface through partaking in gatherings; however, their lives are characterized by hidden trouble and desire. Oscar Wilde proves to be critical towards the lives of upper class men though...

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This section contains 1,278 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Pessimistic View of Victorian Life in "Dorian Gray"
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