The Most Dangerous Game Essay | Student Essay

Richard Connell
This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of How Setting Creates Mood in Richard Connell's The Most Dangerous Game.
This section contains 1,069 words
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How Setting Creates Mood in Richard Connell's The Most Dangerous Game

Summary: this is an essay about the mood in The Most Dangerous Game, written by Richard Connell. By exploring the setting, characters, and plot of the short story called, "The Most Dangerous Game," written by Richard Connell, the mood is discovered to be mysterious and a little of suspense. Mood is the most important element of the story. Mood is what makes the reader know about the characters' feels at a certain moment.
"The Most Dangerous Game"

Mood refers to the emotion felt both by the characters and the reader. Mood may be created by the way that the author chooses to use the words. In the short story called, "The Most Dangerous Game," written by Richard Connell, Rainsford, the protagonist, gets stranded on an island where he goes through a lot of conflicts. In this story the author through his use of setting, characters, and plot creates mood.

The first literary element in this story that creates mood is it's setting; the setting gives the reader some information as what the mood will be like. For example, when Rainsford was sitting down alone on the ship, he thought that "I could sleep without closing my eyes; the night would be my eyelids" (2). When a person closes their eyelids, it becomes very...

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This section contains 1,069 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on How Setting Creates Mood in Richard Connell's The Most Dangerous Game
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