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Essay | Animal Similes and Metaphors in "Of Mice and Men"

This student essay consists of approximately 1 page of analysis of Animal Similes and Metaphors in "Of Mice and Men".
This section contains 269 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
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Animal Similes and Metaphors in "Of Mice and Men"

Summary: John Steinbeck uses animal similes and metaphors in "Of Mice and Men" to describe the character of Lennie. Lennie is first described as a dog, then a sheep, and then finally a bear.
In the book Of Mice and Men, the author, John Steinbeck, uses similes and metaphors to help us understand Lennie as though he were three different animals. First, the author portrays Lennie as a dog that takes to every command. Then, his helplessness is shown, when he seems like a sheep bleating for mercy. Finally, Steinbeck describes him as a violent bear. These animal-like qualities indicated from the beginning that Lennie has mental deficiencies, making him child-like. The author reveals that Lennie does not have control, because his animal instincts over his actions and intentions make him not as responsible as the rest of us.

One of the times Lennie acts like a dog is when George said "If toll him to jump off a cliff off he'd go" (44). Lennie trusts George so much he doesn't think George would make him...

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This section contains 269 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Animal Similes and Metaphors in "Of Mice and Men"
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