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Essay | Dystopian Societies in Literature

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of Dystopian Societies in Literature.
This section contains 1,122 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Dystopian Societies in Literature

Dystopian Societies in Literature

Summary: Dystopia, the opposite of utopia, caused by failed attempts are societal perfection, and a common theme in literature, including George Orwell's "1984," Anthony Burgess's "A Clockwork Orange" and Lois Lowry's "The Giver."
The arena that is reality is a house of balance. With gain comes inherent loss. As the world is imperfect, so too are its inhabitants. With this imperfection, however, comes the meaning of life. The gift of choice granted to man is the trait separating him from the instinctual animal. The belief that choice composes the essence of man is common to many traditions. Through the ability to be flawed, springs man's perfection and his greatest triumph of all: the capacity to elect good over evil, love over hatred. Without the freedom to choose, the vitality, sanctity, and beauty of life must surrender into nonexistence.

+-Enabled by the advances of the Industrial Revolution, the manufacturing trend moved towards production uniformity. Intellectuals of the time began to consider the prospect of applying this sleek homogeny to governance. With the advent of mass production and the dissolution of...

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This section contains 1,122 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Dystopian Societies in Literature
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