The Rover Essay | Cross-dressing and Disguise in Aphra Behn's the Rover

This student essay consists of approximately 8 pages of analysis of Cross-dressing and Disguise in Aphra Behn's the Rover.
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Cross-dressing and Disguise in Aphra Behn's the Rover

Summary: In The Rover cross-dressing and prostitution, like the masquerade and carnival, provide a comic festival of misrule; like the festival, they can only be allowed as a temporary aberration.
Aphra Behn's The Rover is set during the interregnum, that is to say in the period of time before the restoration of Charles II. Furthermore, the action of the play takes place not in England but in Naples during the Carnival time. Consequently, disguising oneself and thus appearing incognito is a major aspect of the story. In The Rover, however, the element of disguise is not only restricted to simply being dressed up in fantasy costumes, but it is also present in one of the female protagonists' tendency of disguising herself as a member of the opposite sex. Furthermore, some characters, like for instance Hellena or Florinda, keep playing with their own identities, for instance, by letting other people see them as gypsies. Therefore, there are several instances when the fact that someone is mistaken for someone else leads to confusion. As...

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This section contains 2,106 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Cross-dressing and Disguise in Aphra Behn's the Rover
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