Martin Luther Essay | Martin Luther's Break from the Catholic Church

This student essay consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis of Martin Luther's Break from the Catholic Church.
This section contains 1,286 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
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Martin Luther's Break from the Catholic Church

Summary: A history of Martin Luther's reformation efforts against the Catholic Church. Martin Luther was a huge figure in religious history. His ideas led to the formation of the Protestant movement and religion, which has since broken into many different types of churches. Luther was unhappy with the 13th century Catholic Church because he felt it had strayed too far from authentic Christianity, especially in the use of indulgences to forgive sins in exchange for money.
The Roman Catholic faith has been in existence for centuries. For many years, no one dared to question the authority of such a high standing power. Not until the 13th century did any action take place in questioning this supremacy of the Catholic Church. Martin Luther stands in history as one of those exceptional forces, an individual who by force of will and by his ideas changed the world fundamentally; very few historical figures were as controversial as he was. His supporters called him a Protestant hero, a freedom fighter, a wise and insightful church leader. His enemies called him a heretic, a traitor, and a disrespectful religious terrorist. But Luther was simply a humble man who set out to change something he disagreed with; he managed to revolutionize an entire religion.

Martin Luther originally planned to become a lawyer; his family made...

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This section contains 1,286 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Martin Luther's Break from the Catholic Church
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