Animal Farm Essay | Parallels to the Russian Revolution in "Animal Farm"

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of Parallels to the Russian Revolution in "Animal Farm".
This section contains 994 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
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Parallels to the Russian Revolution in "Animal Farm"

Summary: George Orwell intended his classic novel "Animal Farm" to be symbolic of the Russian Revolution. Joseph Stalin is represented by Napolean in the book.
Animal Farm, a novella written by George Orwell in 1945 was meant to parallel the Russian Revolution that was going on at the time. If Orwell were to openly oppose the ways of the communist party, he would have undoubtedly been prosecuted. Instead, Orwell wrote Animal Farm to express his hatred for communism in a discreet way. The Russian Communist Party, founded by Lenin, came into power in 1917, ending the reign of the Czars. In the fable the animals on Manor Farm overthrow their leader, Mr. Jones and attempt to govern themselves without men. Two pigs on the farm, Napoleon and Snowball take control of the situation. They represent Joseph Stalin and Leon Trotsky, two political leaders during the revolution. What starts out as a farm where every animal is treated equally ends up being a total dystopia in which Napoleon rules and...

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This section contains 994 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Parallels to the Russian Revolution in "Animal Farm"
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