To Kill a Mockingbird Essay | Symbolism in "To Kill a Mockingbird"

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of Symbolism in "To Kill a Mockingbird".
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Symbolism in "To Kill a Mockingbird"

Summary: Important symbolism in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" include the mockingbird as peace and lost innocence, guns as symbols of power and persecution, and killing of a rabid dog as eradicating prejudice.
Harper Lee employs symbolism extensively throughout "To Kill a Mockingbird." In fact, the title itself can be considered a symbol. This paper will present various objects described in the novel and examine the abstract concepts associated with those objects.

The first and most obvious symbol, the mockingbird, is used by Lee to represent a number of ideas. One of those ideas is the loss of innocence, one of the major themes of the book. The mockingbird is described as a bird that exhibits no harm to anybody but peacefully sings songs. Tom Robinson can be described as a mockingbird because he was wrongly accused even though he did not hurt anyone. Tom is the perfect example of innocence and peace.

Mockingbirds have also been described as having the ability to mimic. In the novel, Boo Radley can be considered a mockingbird because he does...

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This section contains 621 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Symbolism in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
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